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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > Danstar yeast and diacytl
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Old 04-04-2013, 08:01 AM   #1
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Default Danstar yeast and diacytl

I know this can't be the yeast and must be something in my process, but every time I use Dasnstar yeast I get pretty bad diacytl. It sucks because I really want to use this yeast as I love English styles. My system is dialed in so I'm not sure what else to do in order to prevent this. Suggestions?

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Old 04-04-2013, 01:54 PM   #2
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Without knowing anything about your process, I can offer only a few insights: Diacetyl from yeast is usually created during the early stages of fermentation, it can be cleared up using a diacetyl rest which is usually appx. 10 degrees F above the fermentation temperature. It can also be caused from infection, sometimes from unclean serving lines etc.

Here is what palmer says regarding diacetyl:
"Diacetyl is most often described as a butter or butterscotch flavor. Smell an unpopped bag of butter flavor microwave popcorn for a good example. It is desired to a degree in many ales, but in some styles (mainly lagers) and circumstances it is unwanted and may even take on rancid overtones. Diacetyl can be the result of the normal fermentation process or the result of a bacterial infection. Diacetyl is produced early in the fermentation cycle by the yeast and is gradually reassimilated towards the end of the fermentation. A brew that experiences a long lag time due to weak yeast or insufficient aeration will produce a lot of diacetyl before the main fermentation begins. In this case there is often more diacetyl than the yeast can consume at the end of fermentation and it can dominate the flavor of the beer."

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Old 04-04-2013, 07:45 PM   #3
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Hmmm...I do all of that as a standard part of my brewing process. This only happens with dry yeast so I can only deduce that my pitching rate is too low. Next time I'll try a starter to ramp it up.

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Old 04-04-2013, 07:57 PM   #4
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If you are brewing a typical gravity beer there are ample yeast cells in any dry yeast packet. You can go to mrmalty.com to calculate the proper amount of yeast needed for a particular brew.

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Old 04-04-2013, 07:59 PM   #5
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What about Fermenation Temps? The only time I experienced Diacytl was when I fermented WLP001 too warm.

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Old 04-04-2013, 08:06 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JDFlow View Post
Hmmm...I do all of that as a standard part of my brewing process. This only happens with dry yeast so I can only deduce that my pitching rate is too low. Next time I'll try a starter to ramp it up.
You could also just pitch two packets. Simpler and less time consuming than going to the trouble of a starter.

Or rehydrate: won't increase cell count, but it'll make sure they're awake and ready before pitching.

A Danstar Nottingham fan here myself. Hope you get it worked out.

-Rich
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Old 04-05-2013, 03:27 AM   #7
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You could also just pitch two packets. Simpler and less time consuming than going to the trouble of a starter.

Or rehydrate: won't increase cell count, but it'll make sure they're awake and ready before pitching.

A Danstar Nottingham fan here myself. Hope you get it worked out.

-Rich
I also rehydrate.
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Old 04-05-2013, 03:31 AM   #8
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What about Fermenation Temps? The only time I experienced Diacytl was when I fermented WLP001 too warm.
I'm able to and do control temps. Chest freezer and Johnson control. My temp might swing 2 degrees in a really active fermentation.
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Old 04-05-2013, 03:35 AM   #9
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I'm convinced it's the cell count. The first time it happened was in my first pumpkin ale. I tried to convince myself it was a characteristic of the pumpkin. Then I tried an IPA. My last attempt was an English pale. Diacytl, Diacytl, Diacytl.

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Old 04-05-2013, 04:45 AM   #10
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Which Danstar yeast are you using and what are your pitch/ferment temps?
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