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Old 10-06-2011, 01:04 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SwampassJ View Post
Where all the pickled feet beers ones that took a while to take off and refused to clear? That's what got a bunch of posts started that kicked off the last Notty recall.
Pretty much. Nottingham is supposed to be a great flocculator, but it's the only yeast where I got visible yeast clumps in the beer, even on a careful pour.
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Old 12-06-2011, 12:38 PM   #12
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Aroma: There is certainly a fresh yeast/estery aroma up front that gives the beer some nutty character. Mildly fruity (considerably less than at bottling), some biscuit and malt. Not a lot of hops.


I got this same smell/flavor at bottling time as well, did not really enjoy it 100%. Are you saying after aging a short time in bottles it gets toned down a little?

I thought Windsor was just a little too yeasty/fruity for my liking, hopefully bottled it will smooth out.
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Old 12-06-2011, 01:47 PM   #13
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I used it in a brown ale. It tasted ok though it was a little on the sweet side. The one thing that bothered me was the very low flocculation; though it seems like some gelatin and a cold crash would do the trick.

Despite the low flocculation my beer poured very clear after keeping the bottle in the fridge for a few days.

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Old 12-06-2011, 05:28 PM   #14
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I was planning to brew a Moose Drool clone after Christmas with Windsor. Reading this thread makes me think twice about the yeast choice, even though it's in the recipe I found on HBT. I will be bottling my ESB off of a 1968 yeast cake next week. Would it be smarter to use that instead of the Windsor?

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Old 12-06-2011, 06:47 PM   #15
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what's a good alternative (dry yeast) to windsor? i usually use us-04 and us-05 for most brews but do have a few that call for windsor.

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Old 12-06-2011, 08:40 PM   #16
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1968 is close as you are going to get for liquid or you could try cali ale 002 these are the only alternatives that are even close

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Old 12-08-2011, 11:50 PM   #17
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I used Windsor again for two beers: a simple, middle of the road bitter, with only Maris Otter and amber malt and an American IPA.

The bitter is very good and the windsor really accentuates the fruity nature of the british hops, altough it scrubbed out a good amount of hop aroma.

The IPA attenuated to 80% (!), without any sugar in the grist, because I mashed it @ 148F. It didn't scrub much hop aroma in this beer, probably because I used a buttload of centennial in the last 10 minutes. It is a very decent beer, but I would've preferred something less fruity: I used the yeast cake because it's all I had on hand.

From my notes, it's also the yeast that bottle carbs the fastest. So if you want a fast turn around beer and can use a gelatin/crash cooling routine, Windsor might produce satisfactory results.

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Old 10-09-2012, 06:11 PM   #18
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UPDATE:

I brewed again a couple of times with Windsor since my last posts and I think I've reached a good understanding of what this yeast is good for. I have around 8 batches total brewed with it.

A few pointers: this is FAR from a neutral yeast. It leaves its mark on any beer brewed with it. It is very fruity, even when fermented cool.

Aroma: Small fruits and berries (most often raspberries and blackcurrant, never tropical), nutty/fresh yeast esters. Usually overshadows the malt and hop character of the beer. There's also always a strange brown sugar smell. Somewhat generic in that it doesn't tend to be complex.

Taste: Fruity, very little "clean" malt or biscuit, even with high proportions of MO or biscuit type malts. Round and sweet. Boosts the mouthfeel moreso than any other yeast I've come across.

So what is it good for ? I'd use this for ordinary bitters and milds, if you want them fruity. Since it tends to underattenuate and accentuate the body, it's good for simple grists that include sugar. I wouldn't use it for anything roasty or that uses a lot of caramel malt since it can round out too much something like a stout (plus the ester profile is really inappropriate) or become cloying.

Overall, it's not a bad yeast and it certainly doesn't the rep it has for producing muddy beer, but it has to be fined/crash cooled. It needs to be fermented cool though: above 68F and it can become so fruity that you'll question wether you are drinking a wine cooler or a beer.

Why use it ? Honestly, apart from the great mouthfeel and the fact that it is a dry strain, there's not much use to it outside of the low gravity English styles. It does make a good pale bitter though, but it's really not for everybody and it won't produce a Fuller-esque beer no matter what. It might be good for fruit beers since it's so fruity, but I can't really comment on those since I don't brew them.

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Old 11-22-2012, 04:03 PM   #19
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I made my first CDA, and what I was aiming for was something that would highlight the pine flavours in the chinook hops I was using, and at the same time, really bring out the malt. I also hadn't used Windsor, and read that it was good for bitters, so I thought I would give it a try.
I don't think it was the right choice for what I brewed, but time will tell.
My recipe uses a generous dose of dark Crystal and Chocolate malts with Centennial and chinook for bittering/flavouring respectively, and a chinook dry hop.
I bottled yesterday and the beer was really clear (I did use Irish Moss), and the smell was very fruity and sweet, almost tropical. Tasting was odd, it was fruity with a lingering bitterness, and the malt doesn't come through as strong as I had hoped, and the bitterness isn't apparent either, I was aiming for 70IBU, and it doesn't taste bitter at all until the finish.
Time will tell how this one works out, carbonation should make a big change, hopefully for the better, else this is just one lesson that I can learn from.

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Old 11-23-2012, 12:33 PM   #20
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I've been trying to like this yeast as its a different English strain than Nottingham or so4, but it's so damn nutty in aroma and flavor.

I brewed Bobs Session Mild Extract recipe with it and fermented nice and cool at 65f for 3 days in my fridge and then let the beer free rise to room temp to drive attenuation and clean up after itself. Weeks later in the keg, the beer comes off Englishy fruity, but it's so nutty and muddled in aroma and flavor that it overshadows the malt character of the beer. Also, I think the OP is right about fining or crash cooling this yeast, as I think that would help to remove some of the yeast character from the finished beer. I may try this one again on a pale bitter, but even that's up for debate. Can't one of these companies make a dry Fullers strain?

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