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Old 02-05-2011, 12:03 AM   #1
naladaly
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Default coopers heritage lager temp?? and dry hoping

I have a batch of coopers heritage lager on at the minute and i used Saflager s-23 yeast but i kept it at 20 Degrees for fermentation, was this to high and what affect will it have and also should i condition it at a much lower temp?

If anyone has made the heritage lager would it benefet from dry hoping in secondary?

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Old 02-05-2011, 03:25 PM   #2
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I'm assuimg your temp is in Celsius but to be sure...Celsius or Ferenheit?

20 degrees C = 68 degrees F.
(sorry, that's for my reference as I haven't converted my brain to Metric...yet)
Here's a link that I pulled off a Google search.
http://www.brewasaurus.com/index.cfm...st&YeastID=101
It says 48 - 59 degrees F so 9 to 14 degrees C for fermenting so you might have fermented too warm for the style but as long as it finished fermenting...
The other members would have a much better understanding of what effects the warmer fermenting temp would have on the brew but here's my understanding...a lot of brutal off flavors and aromas. Hopefully not too much that it went arseways and is all gammy

As far as conditioning goes there are a LOT of threads from very experienced brewers but I'll reiterate what I've learned. 3 weeks @ 70 degrees F or 21 degrees C. 3 WEEKS! You do that you'll be good to go

I think I got that right....

Brew On,
~BJ

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Old 02-05-2011, 04:39 PM   #3
naladaly
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Thanks for the info.

It's a strange one, the coopers kit calls for a temp of 20 - 27 if using their yeast but then that is an ale right?

The saflager s-23 calls for a temp of between 11 and 20 on the packet but yet lager is not supposed to be up at 20?

It was always under 20 so it might be alright but yet not a lager..it's very confusing, I'm going to buy a 2nd hand fridge and try to really keep the temp around 11

I just have no idea what damage to flavour I did with keeping it at 20 even though the packet says that is fine for that yeast

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Old 02-05-2011, 05:01 PM   #4
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You're right, it was fermented in ale temps.

A wise man once said:
"Don't worry. Have a homebrew."

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Old 02-05-2011, 05:07 PM   #5
naladaly
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Sure all I can do is wait and hope, bottle and forget about it for a year outside in the cold..I think

I'll brew on..

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Old 02-05-2011, 05:33 PM   #6
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About dry hopping, I haven't tried it....let me know how it worked for you if you end up doing that. I will be trying it with some home grown hops (Glacier) in one of my next brews.

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Old 02-05-2011, 05:36 PM   #7
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I have dry hoped it so I'll let you know how it turns out, do you grow your own hops? I would love to try but they grow about 14ft right?

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Old 02-05-2011, 07:14 PM   #8
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LoL, no....35 to 40 feet. But I grew mine a vertical of about 10 feet then set them on a horizontal string and they grew another 6 feet or so. But this last year was their first year. They did produce almost a full pound though! You should grow some if you can. Even growing one variety is very freeing and educational. It gave me an appreciation for the high cost of hops...I used some straight from the vine only days before I harvested and it was lightly hopped (due to the fact that they were wet and not dried at all) but the aroma and taste came through. If you live in an urban area there might be a local farmer or gardener who would be willing to sacrifice the small amount of land it takes to grow hops in exchange for some homebrew?

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Old 02-07-2011, 12:24 PM   #9
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35 to 40 feet!? are they hard to grow ie. do they need a lot of work or certin conditions?
Space is not an issue as i have 50 acre's..there is onle one farm in Ireland that still grow hops and i dont think they even sell them.

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Old 02-07-2011, 02:01 PM   #10
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not hard to grow at all given they are provided plenty of sunshine. The root system shouldn't get too wet otherwise you run the chance of rot or other possible diseases...but generally they are a weed and will thrive in many conditions. This shouldn't be confused with the fact that they LOVE water. Just not standing water. So if you don't plant them on the bank of a lake or pond you should be just fine A lot of loosened dirt gives the sprouts a MUCH easier time poking through and getting sunshine.
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f92/some...ng-hops-55601/
http://www.freshops.com/hop-growing/...ning/#planting
You can check out these links for further info the growing of hops. They aren't hard to grow at all. The first year you won't get much of a crop, but don't be discouraged because the second year will yield a lot more of a crop as the plant is starting to mature. They spread like fire so you gotta be careful and lend an eye (maybe both) on watching for new sprouts. Anyway, most of what I've said and everything I can think of is all in those links I'm sure. Good luck!

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