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Old 03-21-2011, 01:42 AM   #1
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Default Can I ferment completely closed in corny keg under pressure?

No airlock, pressure relief, or blowoff. I wait a month for everything to settle after fermentation, cold crash for another 2 weeks, then attach a gas post to relieve pressure. Has anybody tried this? Will the excess pressure be too high? will the yeast survive under that amount of pressure and make good beer?

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Old 03-21-2011, 02:38 AM   #2
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I've never tested it out. I would pull the pressure release once or twice a day just to be safe.

Also be prepared for seriously reduced ester and phenolics. You'll probably also have slower than normal fermentation as a result of the pressure.

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Old 03-21-2011, 02:46 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by Homebrewtastic View Post
I've never tested it out. I would pull the pressure release once or twice a day just to be safe.

Also be prepared for seriously reduced ester and phenolics. You'll probably also have slower than normal fermentation as a result of the pressure.
I'm actually toying with the idea. The ester and phenolics reduction would be a bonus as it's a pils that I have in the corny. I'm just worried that the yeast cell walls cannot handle the pressure and will burst leading to autolysys. Also if I pull the pressure release won't I spray beer all over the place during active fermentation?
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Old 03-21-2011, 03:19 AM   #4
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It's plausible. Again, I haven't tested it out, so I don't know.

I know that Sierra Nevada ferments warm and under a couple psi for their "lagers". This way they can get a quicker turn around and keep the right flavors.

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Old 03-21-2011, 04:08 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redalert
No airlock, pressure relief, or blowoff. I wait a month for everything to settle after fermentation, cold crash for another 2 weeks, then attach a gas post to relieve pressure. Has anybody tried this? Will the excess pressure be too high? will the yeast survive under that amount of pressure and make good beer?
That's how some of the big guys do lagers in a week at 65+. The pressure supresses ester production. It'll be a subpar lager but it'll be drinkable.
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Old 03-21-2011, 04:44 AM   #6
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That's how some of the big guys do lagers in a week at 65+. The pressure supresses ester production. It'll be a subpar lager but it'll be drinkable.
Why subpar? because of the temps? and if so I was planning to ferment at 55F.
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Old 03-21-2011, 05:27 AM   #7
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Why subpar? because of the temps? and if so I was planning to ferment at 55F.
I don't know why, something about the yeast not being as healthy under a few psi as they would be if not. The comment above was just a reiteration of what I heard on the Jamil Show on one of the archived episodes when Jamil did a quick blip on it (off topic from the show if I recall correctly). I just thought I'd stick it in there as my own 2 cents
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Old 03-21-2011, 11:30 AM   #8
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Quote:
It'll be a subpar lager but it'll be drinkable.
Ahhhhh, so that's how they make huge quantities of Natty Light, so fast.
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Old 03-21-2011, 01:42 PM   #9
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I think you are underestimating how much pressure will actually build up. If your doing 5 gallons in a corny it will be almost completely full and the amount of Co2 it puts off will be significant. If it doesn't blow the O-ring right out of the lid or worse it will definitely over carb the beer. My understanding is that the big guys begin to pinch back on the blow off lines later in the fermentation to use some of the Co2 to self carbonate. I think when they ferment under pressure to help increase fermentation time it is at something like 15psi which I imagine you will far exceed with a completely closed vessel.

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Old 03-21-2011, 02:19 PM   #10
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I second the "you may be underestimating the pressure" thought. I ferment in cornies, and have had my gas tube plug up a few times. Once while trying to clear the obstruction, a piece of whole hop (followed by a shock wave of beer) blew out and hit me in the face almost hard enough to knock me over. That was my first "cleaning beer off the ceiling" moment. The amount of pressure (and beer foam) I've had to release when getting a plug even 2 or 3 days into fermentation is amazing.

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