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Old 06-16-2010, 12:14 AM   #11
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Yea, I wasn't sure about that so I didn't try it.

I would think this would take off fairly quickly if there is Saccharomyces cerevisiae on those berries, we'll see in a day or two. I have it in the cellar and go to swirl it every time I think about it.

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Old 06-17-2010, 01:56 PM   #12
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I'm going to have to try this. There are a ton of juniper berry bushes around my neighborhood. I also can't wait until some of these wild hop vines start to flower. We'll see how many other people have the same idea that I do.

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Old 06-17-2010, 02:49 PM   #13
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Killing off the wild yeast is great for wine, but they are also adding their own yeasts later. I think that if you want to use the yeast that is on the berries it will be important NOT to use sulfites or starsan to start with.

However, if you only want the yeast, then try culturing with lab dishes and use their techniques for harvesting. There must be a standard technique for wiping the white stuff off the berries. There is a good chance you will get some other stuff in there as well. Bacteria is everywhere.

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Old 06-21-2010, 12:44 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Homercidal View Post
Killing off the wild yeast is great for wine, but they are also adding their own yeasts later. I think that if you want to use the yeast that is on the berries it will be important NOT to use sulfites or starsan to start with.

However, if you only want the yeast, then try culturing with lab dishes and use their techniques for harvesting. There must be a standard technique for wiping the white stuff off the berries. There is a good chance you will get some other stuff in there as well. Bacteria is everywhere.
I was hoping this would take off faster than any bacteria would be able to catch hold, it's been 5 days and finally starting to see a tiny bit of foam on the top, there's also some trub, it looks like yeast, but we'll see. I'll take a picture if things get dramatic. Hopefully the hops will retard the bacterium.

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Old 06-21-2010, 06:00 PM   #15
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COLObrewer,
The best way to get yeast is the way our ancestors did; fermentation! It selects for yeast, more or less.
Most likely the series of things growing in your ferment would imitate a lambic, as was posted above.
First, some kind of bacteria, then after a day to a week, a Saccharomyces or closely related yeast would dominate. Later on, Brettanomyces and some bacteria.
Culture out of the active ferment and you'll get some kind of yeast. You could do a few starters from different areas in the juniper patch, taste them and culture from the one that tastes OK.

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Old 06-22-2010, 01:46 AM   #16
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JohnMc,
Thanx for the info, I'm still confused on the whole 2 week thing. Why does yeast that has already been harvested take off within 3-4 days and yeast that is in the wild take 2 weeks? Is it strictly a "numbers" thing? Does saccharomyces have to multiply to the correct ratio in order to start? Maybe Palmers book has something, I think I have seen that somewhere.

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Old 06-22-2010, 04:29 AM   #17
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I have made cider 2 ways. One is I killed all the living stuff with tablets - sodium something or other and added champagne yeast. The other way I've made it, you get a sweeter cider by adding raisins. The yeast on the raisins ferments the cider as long as it is natural cider. The champagne yeast fermented down to below 1.000. As I said, the raisins gave a sweeter cider. I don't know if the cider would've fermented without the raisins.

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Old 06-22-2010, 12:55 PM   #18
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Quote:
Is it strictly a "numbers" thing?
Most likely that's it, although they could be sitting in spores. Our homebrewing yeast doesn't sporulate much (though it can), I think we've selected it to do so, probably so it jumps straight away into fermentation.
Anyway, likely one berry has a few to a few hundred yeast cells on it, one colony of yeast probably has tens of millions to hundreds of millions of cells.
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Old 06-22-2010, 09:13 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnMc View Post
Most likely that's it, although they could be sitting in spores. Our homebrewing yeast doesn't sporulate much (though it can), I think we've selected it to do so, probably so it jumps straight away into fermentation.
Anyway, likely one berry has a few to a few hundred yeast cells on it, one colony of yeast probably has tens of millions to hundreds of millions of cells.
That's logical, I took a couple of pics at 7 days, it's krausening and you should be able to see the ever growing trub at the bottom.

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Old 07-09-2010, 10:29 PM   #20
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So, I decided to brew with this since it appears to be making alot of nice yeast after I fed it again. We brewed up a quick batch of 80 schilling, I made it a 7 gallon batch in order to experiment with one gallon.

But here is the exciting part, I pitched most of this juniper yeast in the 6 gallon batch and some in a yeast vial, then the rest in a 1 gallon batch of the 80 schilling, it seams to like 75-80 F temp, I've been playing with it, when it seemed to floculate and slow in the cellar at appx. 65F, I moved it to the house (75-80F) and it took off again, I brewed this and pitched the next day.

Edit: I racked this off the juniper berries prior to adding more wort which was appx. 1.035 gravity.


My plans are to see if this yeast will ferment this 80 schilling (1.054 OG) and for the 1gallon batch I will add dme or brown sugar to get it up around 1.1 OG to see if I can use it for the "poor scotts strong ale" Which (if all goes well) I will pitch onto the yeast cake of the 80 schilling, or maybe the high gravity 1 gallon batch cake.


What are your thoughts?

Keep on brewing my friends

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