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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > California common lager yeast
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Old 04-20-2011, 06:49 PM   #11
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Top fermented refers to ale yeast, bottom fermented to lager yeast. The little beasties either float or sink when fermenting as I understand.

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Old 04-20-2011, 08:47 PM   #12
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I've brewed a great American Light Lager and a nice Oktoberfest with the San Francisco Lager yeast. I did control my fermentation and kept the yeast on the cool side (around 60*F if I recall correctly) and it performed wonderfully. It reached terminal gravity quickly and had the characteristic taste and illusive "crispness" of a true lager strain. I've read of brewers having estery issues when using this strain at room temps (ambient temps of 70+*F), but I've never gone that high with it. In response to the OP's point, I totally agree: great lagers can be made with this yeast at cool temperatures, and I think more brewers should experiment with it.

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Old 01-17-2012, 11:57 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbeergeek View Post
I've brewed a great American Light Lager and a nice Oktoberfest with the San Francisco Lager yeast. I did control my fermentation and kept the yeast on the cool side (around 60*F if I recall correctly) and it performed wonderfully. It reached terminal gravity quickly and had the characteristic taste and illusive "crispness" of a true lager strain. I've read of brewers having estery issues when using this strain at room temps (ambient temps of 70+*F), but I've never gone that high with it. In response to the OP's point, I totally agree: great lagers can be made with this yeast at cool temperatures, and I think more brewers should experiment with it.



Well said! and this goes back to what jfowler1 was saying, the difference between making beer and brewing-to-style is just that. Brewing an O-Fest with this strain was simply making beer, or more specifically brewing a lager and would do poorly being judged under that style. But no doubt that 2112 made a great O-Fest.

Thanks beergeek, I have been toying with the idea of a Marzen or a Czech Pils recipe with this strain!
Might have a great experiment on my hands! ---- 10gal of O-Fest 5gal with 2112 and 5gal with 2206. (all under lager ferm specs)
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Old 01-18-2012, 12:42 AM   #14
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Right now I have my first Lager in my ferm chamber fermenting with 2112, on reccomendation from the guy at the brewshop it is fermenting at 54F. I need to rack it into the secondary later tonight. Then 2 days for the D-rest, and then lager it for a few weeks around 34F. Does that sound about right or should I skip the lagering with this yeast/is it worth the extra effort? If not then I can have another beer in there sooner.

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Old 01-18-2012, 07:23 PM   #15
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Sure, you could most certainly lager with this yeast. Just be sure your target gravity has been reached after your D-rest. 54F is on the low side of the temp range for this yeast so if i was you i would give it some extra time to finish up. If you are bottling then you may want to move your carboy out to room temp a day before bottling day, and leave your bottles at room temp for 2 weeks to properly carb. then back into cold storage to continue lagering in the bottle (cold conditioning).

To sum up, it is certainly worth the effort to lager for 2-3 months depending on the style your are brewing? if you are doing an ale then i recommend lagering for a short period, maybe a month or less.

EDIT* sorry i just noticed you said you were making a lager. (some people make nice ales with this yeast as well)
so yeah lager it up but remember to only rack into secondary once your target gravity is reached. if you begin your D-rest when you are atleast 75% there then 2-3 days at room temp will probably finish it off gravity wise.

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