Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > Butter beer
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 08-01-2013, 02:14 AM   #1
NewkyBrown
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Posts: 194
Liked 7 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 19

Default Butter beer

I'm too pee'd off to do a search for the answer to this question!
I have 5 gallons of centennial blonde in a keg which has an overwhelming butter taste. I did ferment slightly too high - 72F. Is all lost? Should I dump it or will the taste die down a bit over time? I fermented for two and a half weeks and 1 week in keg so far. Notty yeast.
Thanks...

__________________
NewkyBrown is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-01-2013, 03:30 AM   #2
BigFloyd
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
BigFloyd's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Tyler, Texas
Posts: 4,813
Liked 628 Times on 549 Posts
Likes Given: 575

Default

Uh oh. Butter flavor = diacetyl. In a lighter style like blonde ale, you will obviously notice it much more than you might in a darker, roasty brew. If you have a high level, it may never condition out. Sorry.

Nottingham is probably the #1 worst dry ale yeast to let ferment too warmly. It has a solid reputation for kicking off some funky off-flavors if allowed to get above 68*F while it is actively feasting on sugars (during the first 4-5 days). If 72*F was your air temp, that is going to give you a downright disappointing result every time.

Notty does best in the upper 50's to lower 60's during the active portion of the process. I like it and have run it as low as 55*F with success. You can then let it warm finish up around 66-67*F (to clean up normal by-products).
__________________
Good Temp Control -----> Happy Yeast ------> Tasty Brew
BigFloyd is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-01-2013, 03:50 AM   #3
NewkyBrown
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Posts: 194
Liked 7 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 19

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigFloyd
Uh oh. Butter flavor = diacetyl. In a lighter style like blonde ale, you will obviously notice it much more than you might in a darker, roasty brew. If you have a high level, it may never condition out. Sorry.

Nottingham is probably the #1 worst dry ale yeast to let ferment too warmly. It has a solid reputation for kicking off some funky off-flavors if allowed to get above 68*F while it is actively feasting on sugars (during the first 4-5 days). If 72*F was your air temp, that is going to give you a downright disappointing result every time.

Notty does best in the upper 50's to lower 60's during the active portion of the process. I like it and have run it as low as 55*F with success. You can then let it warm finish up around 66-67*F (to clean up normal by-products).
I suspected I'd have off flavors as I did ferment too warm but didn't think it would taste this bad.
It's a shame as I don't have a lot of time to brew often so will have to get some more rolling soon.

Ill be more careful next time! Thanks for your reply. I may use Us-05 or 04 until the winter!
__________________
NewkyBrown is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-01-2013, 11:56 AM   #4
libeerty
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 5 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 495
Liked 101 Times on 67 Posts
Likes Given: 42

Default

Hold up! Don't dump yet! Do you have more Nottingham? Or any ale yeast actually? Make a 1L starter with it. Put keg where it was 72. When the starter is actively fermenting (8-24 hours), add it to your keg.

I just did this with two kegs of an IPA and it worked very quickly! The yeast ate up all of the diacetyl in 4 days. It can take longer, but since its a keg you can try it from time to time.

__________________

Tried to keep up with this signature, but just couldn't.

libeerty is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-01-2013, 12:12 PM   #5
cluckk
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
cluckk's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: San Antonio, TX
Posts: 1,599
Liked 353 Times on 227 Posts
Likes Given: 47

Default

I live in an area that is quite warm in the summer (Ok, it's hellishly hot!). I used to live in Eastern Montana and know that the continental temperatures there can get pretty hot as well (I assume Alberta is pretty similar). Rather than fighting these really high temps during ferments I go from US-05 and into Saison during early summer (using a swamp cooler if needed). As the summer gets hotter I have recently started switching to making wine. Then in late September I'll go back to ales, with the heaviest stuff brewed in November, December and January. This works for me in my area.

__________________

"So you say you just brewed your first batch of beer. Welcome to the obsession." --me, to every first time brewer I ever meet.

cluckk is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-01-2013, 12:37 PM   #6
NewkyBrown
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Posts: 194
Liked 7 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 19

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by libeerty
Hold up! Don't dump yet! Do you have more Nottingham? Or any ale yeast actually? Make a 1L starter with it. Put keg where it was 72. When the starter is actively fermenting (8-24 hours), add it to your keg.

I just did this with two kegs of an IPA and it worked very quickly! The yeast ate up all of the diacetyl in 4 days. It can take longer, but since its a keg you can try it from time to time.
I have some W001 that needs using up. Would that work? Should I let the keg reach the warm temp before I add the starter?

Thanks for your help. I would love to save this beer !
__________________
NewkyBrown is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-01-2013, 12:38 PM   #7
NewkyBrown
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Posts: 194
Liked 7 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 19

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cluckk
I live in an area that is quite warm in the summer (Ok, it's hellishly hot!). I used to live in Eastern Montana and know that the continental temperatures there can get pretty hot as well (I assume Alberta is pretty similar). Rather than fighting these really high temps during ferments I go from US-05 and into Saison during early summer (using a swamp cooler if needed). As the summer gets hotter I have recently started switching to making wine. Then in late September I'll go back to ales, with the heaviest stuff brewed in November, December and January. This works for me in my area.
Sounds like a better idea. I used to think my basement was too cool in winter here but actually it's perfect!
__________________
NewkyBrown is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-01-2013, 05:32 PM   #8
libeerty
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 5 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 495
Liked 101 Times on 67 Posts
Likes Given: 42

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NewkyBrown View Post
I have some W001 that needs using up. Would that work? Should I let the keg reach the warm temp before I add the starter?

Thanks for your help. I would love to save this beer !
I think 001 would be perfect for it. And yeah, I'd warm it up before. Let me know how it works out for you!
__________________

Tried to keep up with this signature, but just couldn't.

libeerty is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-01-2013, 05:51 PM   #9
YtBoI
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: West Covina, CA
Posts: 116
Liked 3 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Boil up 2 habaneros and toss them in the keg that will get rid of the diacetyl flavor. Plus you’ll only get a little heat from the chilies.

__________________
Primary - SAD AND EMPTY! Secondary - Sour Brown 6/13 and Falnders Red 11/13
Keg1-Apple Pie Cider Keg2-Pumpkin Pie Ale Bottled - Vanilla Cider, Obsidian Rye 2012, Barley Wine 2012, Sberry Blonde, MC2S 2013(IIPA) 16.5% Abv
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f189/few...w-club-415968/
YtBoI is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-02-2013, 04:16 AM   #10
NewkyBrown
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Posts: 194
Liked 7 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 19

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by libeerty

I think 001 would be perfect for it. And yeah, I'd warm it up before. Let me know how it works out for you!
I have made the starter. Ill add it tomorrow. When its finished, will I need to rack the beer to another keg or will the yeast come out in the first couple of pints?

Thanks.
__________________
NewkyBrown is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Butter Beer! blascar Equipment/Sanitation 1 12-19-2012 09:47 PM
peanut butter beer? hophead44 Recipes/Ingredients 3 01-10-2012 10:54 PM
Butter Beer homebeerbrewer General Techniques 9 09-29-2011 10:25 PM
Butter beer? whosaid Extract Brewing 5 08-10-2011 10:13 PM
Butter Beer... RookieBrew Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 24 04-13-2006 02:56 AM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS