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Old 02-02-2011, 03:43 PM   #21
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bierhaus - unfortunately the current bitter is one of your non-favorite yeasts - wy1098 - pitched from a brew in production. I am considering giving it 7-10 days of ferment time, rising for d-rest, and crash cooling it per your other English yeast instructions. Any tips or specific instructions for 1098?

I have one more British ale on deck - a northern brown - that needs that last little something to take it to the top echelon and I may have found it in this thread. Fortunately I can practice on the bitter that is only 3 days old

This has been a wonderful thread full of info I never even began to consider - thank you all for that!

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Old 02-02-2011, 04:05 PM   #22
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As previously said, different base malts do make a huge difference. I use all MO for my English ales (though I do like optic malt) and at the moment am really liking Bairds Maris Otter. I used TF&Sons for a while but stopped since I got more biscuit character from the Bairds. Haven't used Crisp MO much. I just bought 5 bags of the Bairds stuff, so it looks like I'll be using that for a while.

Milo, I am not a huge fan of wy1098. Not that there is anything wrong with it, it's just that I have found it to be quite one dimensional for my tastes. It is very similar to S-04 in most respects and you won't really get any of those complex yeast esters and big malt profile as you'd get with wy1968 or 1187. And fermented warm (> 68F), 1098, 1099, and S-04 can be particularly tart tasting - almost like an unsweetened yogurt. I used 1098 for my stouts and porters when I first started out. My only suggestion with that yeast is to aerate well and don't let your temps get too high. Good luck.

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Old 02-02-2011, 04:20 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by Beerrific View Post
Also, what base malts are you using? I assume you are using a British Pale Ale malt from a Maris Otter or similar cultivar, but I have found recently that all British Pale Ale malts are not created equal. I have found significant differences between the MO from a variety of maltsters.
Beerrific - Out of curiosity, what brands have you used? My own experience with MO has been exclusively with Munton & Fison so I'm interested in hearing opinions on other maltsters.
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Old 02-02-2011, 04:29 PM   #24
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Interesting to hear that Bairds malt as I visit Haddington a lot (family) and always take a wander by the maltster. Generally you can't select by maltster in most of our HBSs and you just get whatever Maris Otter they happen to supply. Personally I've had great results with Fawcetts and I use all of their malts for ales now and Weyermann for lagers.

I know about the malt character you're talking about and I tend to think it's caused by residual sugars, British base malt, British crystals and slight diacetyl. I think the yeast is key. I am used to using White Labs yeast and while the results are great (White Labs Burton & British are favourites) they don't have the malt character you're talking about. The closest I have tasted is someone else's beer with wyeast 1318. So that would be my first stop. Alternatively I would recommend Brew Labs yeast slants, I have never used them but I have heard great things about their flavour characteristics, try contacting them directly with the kind of thing your after. Some of these are even dual strains.

http://www.brewlab.co.uk/analysisand...h.asp#homebrew

Here's an HBS that sells a range

http://www.the-home-brew-shop.co.uk/...st_Slants.html

Yeast is the key I think.

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Old 02-02-2011, 05:43 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrewNow View Post
Beerrific - Out of curiosity, what brands have you used? My own experience with MO has been exclusively with Munton & Fison so I'm interested in hearing opinions on other maltsters.
I have used Munton's, Thomas Fawcett, and Crisp. I do not like the Munton's. I could not tell it gave my beer any more character than something like Briess 2-row. When I used the Fawcett, I enjoyed it and found it better than the Munton's. Then I switched to Crisp and have been making some really nice beers with it (along with the 1469). Granted, I have never had a proper English ale that has not been subject to a trans-Atlantic torture, but I feel like I must be close.

I should also qualify that I have never tried these malts all side by side. That is something I wold like to do someday.
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Old 02-02-2011, 07:19 PM   #26
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I have used Munton's, Thomas Fawcett, and Crisp. I do not like the Munton's. I could not tell it gave my beer any more character than something like Briess 2-row.
That's the effect that I get when I mash thin.
I've not tried Bairds or Crisp. I use Munton's most of the time, and have used Thomas Fawcett occasionally, and I don't think I could tell the difference between them.

-a.
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Old 02-03-2011, 08:55 PM   #27
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You can use a poly-pin in place of a cask, Northern Brewer has a guide that details how to achieve some of that oxidation character
http://www.northernbrewer.com/docume...nditioning.pdf
Read page 2 of that for more info.
OK, now that I've read that, I have to try it.

Is this the sort of thing they're referring to?

http://www.amazon.com/Reliance-Produ...6769387&sr=1-1
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Old 02-03-2011, 09:58 PM   #28
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I'm making a starter of Wy1968 tonight for a best bitter I'll brew Saturday to check out the fermentation profile I mentioned in the first post. I was going to go really simple with the malt bill but have decided to do something a bit more like what I've been experimenting with in trying to come up with my own bitter recipe. Here's how it will look barring any last-minute changes.

OG 1.044
IBU 35
SRM 12.6

3400 g Maris Otter
220 g Amber Malt
200 g Simpson's Dark Crystal (75L)
60 g Crisp Chocolate Malt

28 g Northern Brewer @ 60
14 g Fuggles @ 10

Mash @ 150 for 90 minutes at a thickness of 1.25 qts/lb

Pitch yeast at 64 and let rise to 68 naturally. Hold at 68 until SG is around 1.020 then drop temp back to 64. When SG is 1.011 or so I will drop the temp to 44 degrees and hold for a week or so. Hopefully the diacetyl isn't too crazy. I'm hoping to capture a bit in order to get that tofee/butterscotch thing going, but I'm hoping to stay away from the fake butter. After the 44 degree "lager" I'll keg and transfer the keg straight to the kegerator where I'll carb it and hopefully drink it after a weeks time. Total time from grain to glass should be around 3 weeks.

If it turns out as well as I suspect it will, my wife will be hard pressed to pull me away from the kegerator.

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Old 02-04-2011, 01:33 AM   #29
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I'm lucky to have a local brewery that started using 1968 for nearly all their beers some 16-18 years ago. I'm sure their yeast has changed a bit since then, but they get the most amazing malt and ester flavors in their (especially cask conditioned) ales. It takes all my willpower not to go there every day and turn into a broke drunkard. Next time I'm in, I'm going to see if there's anyone around that knows the particulars of the mash and fermentation schedule. They sure know how to treat the Fuller's strain right, and I'd love to get some tips from them. I'll pass along their methods, if you're interested.

Oh, and good luck with the bitter!

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Old 02-04-2011, 01:49 AM   #30
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I'll pass along their methods, if you're interested.
Definitely, that would be awesome!
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