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Old 05-13-2012, 10:12 PM   #21
Tamarlane
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The more I look at it the more I feel that I need to give a partial mash or BIAB a try.
I'm not certain if I should look into converting my neglected 2 gal water jug or try insulating a pot with a sleeping bag or just keep the pot on a burner set low and frequently stir.
What I use to do is heat my water to strike temp with a mesh bag lining the pot, add grains and stir like hell, stabilize then throw the lid on and stick it in the oven preheated to the lowest temp (in my case 170'F). 60 minutes later voila, remove bag of grain, add water and extract and boil away

I could partial mash up to 6.5 lbs of grain so I could brew just about any all grain recipe as partial mash by just replacing a portion of the base malt with extract and doing the rest as a mash
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Old 05-14-2012, 04:01 AM   #22
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Not saying that method didn't work for you but a couple of concerns with that method:

First, I would think that, in doing a small mini-mash as has been proposed, putting around a gallon of water and 2.5 lb of grain in a 170F oven would would run a good chance of heating the works up to 170 (thus denaturing the enzymes) before conversion is complete.

Also, ovens are notoriously inaccurate. Their temperature can be off by 10-20 degrees (up or down) if you set it at 170 and it's actually 150 or 160 then great. But if it's really 180 or 190, no-so-great.

It's really not much of an issue if your mini-mash drops below your target temp for a bit-just heat it back to temp. But if it gets too hot and the enzymes are killed there's no going back.

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Old 05-14-2012, 05:03 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rodwha View Post
The more I look at it the more I feel that I need to give a partial mash or BIAB a try.
I'm not certain if I should look into converting my neglected 2 gal water jug or try insulating a pot with a sleeping bag or just keep the pot on a burner set low and frequently stir.
If your partial mash volume is relatively small, the oven is a great way to mash. Pre-heat it to 150F. Heat your strike water, dough in, stir real well then cover it and put it in the oven. The oven heats from all sides and really helps maintain the temps.

EDIT: Just saw this was covered already. This is the way I do all my steeping also.
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Old 05-14-2012, 10:48 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by WilliamWS View Post
Not saying that method didn't work for you but a couple of concerns with that method:

First, I would think that, in doing a small mini-mash as has been proposed, putting around a gallon of water and 2.5 lb of grain in a 170F oven would would run a good chance of heating the works up to 170 (thus denaturing the enzymes) before conversion is complete.

Also, ovens are notoriously inaccurate. Their temperature can be off by 10-20 degrees (up or down) if you set it at 170 and it's actually 150 or 160 then great. But if it's really 180 or 190, no-so-great.

It's really not much of an issue if your mini-mash drops below your target temp for a bit-just heat it back to temp. But if it gets too hot and the enzymes are killed there's no going back.
Stir and check the temp every 15-20 minutes and no worries. The oven never heated the mash more than a couple degrees over an hour. I used more than a gallon of water though, it was more like 2.5-3.5 gallons.

I am not using the oven to hit my mash tun I am using it as an insulator to maintain the temp for an hour. For that purpose accuracy is not required, if anything just stick a probe thermometer in the mash and keep an eye on it. Too hot --> take it out of the oven for a couple minutes

Heating any significant volume of water in an oven is extremely inefficient, especially with a 10 or 20 or 40 degree temp difference between the mash and the oven temp. If you were mashing for 12 hours you may end up getting the mash up to the oven temp. But in an hour you don't have to worry. Worst comes to worst just turn the oven off or open the door a bit.
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