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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > Brettanomyces dregs in the primary ... what to do?
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Old 12-28-2012, 10:22 PM   #1
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Default Brettanomyces dregs in the primary ... what to do?

Apologies if this is well discussed on another thread. I am going to rack to secondary a 5 gallon batch of brett belgian very soon. It spent 4 weeks in the primary and the fermentation is complete.

My question is, what is a good recommendation for the dregs? I dont have a beer ready to pitch onto it but figure there is some room for an experimental batch in the near future. Should I save it or pitch over it? Ideas and thoughts appreciated : )

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Old 12-29-2012, 12:48 AM   #2
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When you have racked the beer, swirl up the yeast and remaining liquid to make a slurry and pour into 2 sanitized quart mason jars. Store in fridge and vent every few days.

Should keep for a month without any issues. Just use one of the jars to start a new beer.

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Old 12-29-2012, 03:09 PM   #3
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I would say a strong hoppy brown with most,if not all of the ibus coming in the last 15 mins.

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Old 12-29-2012, 05:30 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Calder View Post
When you have racked the beer, swirl up the yeast and remaining liquid to make a slurry and pour into 2 sanitized quart mason jars. Store in fridge and vent every few days.

Should keep for a month without any issues. Just use one of the jars to start a new beer.
This is the same as what I would do.

It should last several months.
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Old 12-30-2012, 08:37 PM   #5
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thanks! I read somewhere that I can keep in a mason jar but I didnt know if it needed and airlock or venting. Any recommendations on the type of beer to pitch it into? Brett can be a little funky so I'd want to know that I was helping a beer and not hurting it :P.

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Old 12-30-2012, 08:58 PM   #6
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Is this just brett or a brett/sacc blend? If it's the former, it's best kept at room temp rather than in the fridge.

If you're new to rinsing yeast, check out this thread.

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Old 12-31-2012, 11:29 AM   #7
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Is this just brett or a brett/sacc blend? If it's the former, it's best kept at room temp rather than in the fridge.
I've never heard that, why is that?

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If you're new to rinsing yeast, check out this thread.
I've never been able to measure any benefit of water washing yeast. It only succeeds in putting 95% of the viable cells down the drain IME.
http://woodlandbrew.blogspot.com/201...g-exposed.html
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Old 12-31-2012, 11:42 AM   #8
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I've never heard that, why is that?


I've never been able to measure any benefit of water washing yeast. It only succeeds in putting 95% of the viable cells down the drain IME.
http://woodlandbrew.blogspot.com/201...g-exposed.html
It's cause Chad Yakobsen says so. I don't know why.

Are you trying to say there is just as much non-yeast matter in the clean, white yeast I get after rinsing as in the yeast cake/trub I rack off of? If so, I don't believe that.
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Old 12-31-2012, 11:43 AM   #9
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I've never been able to measure any benefit of water washing yeast. It only succeeds in putting 95% of the viable cells down the drain IME.
http://woodlandbrew.blogspot.com/201...g-exposed.html
Actually, the post you reference here recommends pouring off the liquid. It simply recommends it for a reason different than usually given. It says to do this to reduce bacteria--which is itself a good thing.
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Old 12-31-2012, 12:02 PM   #10
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Actually, the post you reference here recommends pouring off the liquid. It simply recommends it for a reason different than usually given. It says to do this to reduce bacteria--which is itself a good thing.
Yes, that is what I have seen.

The part that I call "water washing" also commonly refereed to as "yeast washing" or "yeast rinsing" that wastes viable yeast is allowing some of it to settle and pouring off the top in a container to save. This is what dumps 95% of the viable cells down the drain.
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