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Old 01-19-2011, 03:43 AM   #1
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Default Bottom sludge of primary might of went in secondary. Will this affect taste?

I started a clone of fat tire from H B Magazine, i just racked to secondary using siphoning cane and i got a lil amount to sludge in my carboy. This made it a lil coudy, but starting to settle. Will this affect my final beer taste.

Thank you,

Gabe

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Old 01-19-2011, 03:49 AM   #2
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Not really. The secondary is for further settling. You will get better at this over time.

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Old 01-19-2011, 04:20 AM   #3
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Getting a little in the transfer is part of the learning curve. With a few more brews, you'll get better and better with racking to the point where you'll leave more and more behind. If you brew enough to offset what you lose due to trub, then you'll get full 5 gallon batches (into bottles/kegs)...

If you let the brew stay in primary long enough, the trub will compact more so that there's less chance of picking up any when you transfer. I would say that unless you're actually racking in order to add flavor elements, or to place the brew into something else for aging, you can leave it in primary for the entire ferment time. I didn't know any better for my first two brews, so I racked to secondary since I thought it was going to make for a better brew... I've since learned different.

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Old 01-19-2011, 03:02 PM   #4
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I thought there is a chance of the trub to contaminate the brew if left with dead yeast?

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Old 01-19-2011, 03:05 PM   #5
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Nowadays since many of us don't secondary at all and leave our beer in primary for a month, and THAT doesn't affect the taste, it should let you realize that getting some in secondary ain't gonna matter either.

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Old 01-19-2011, 03:06 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wulfman View Post
I thought there is a chance of the trub to contaminate the brew if left with dead yeast?
The yeast in the bottom isn't dead.....



Go read this...http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f163/secondary-not-john-palmer-jamil-zainasheff-weigh-176837/

It will clarify that little mistake/misinformation you've been operating under.
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Old 01-19-2011, 03:16 PM   #7
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Revvy beat me to the reply...

I've left a brew in primary for a month without ill effects. If anything it's better with the longer time on the cake. As also mentioned, the yeast isn't dead (it's dormant) after even a month. I don't recall exactly how long it would take for the yeast to actually die off enough to effect the brew, but I can't see us going that long.

Personally, I'm leaving brews in primary for a minimum of 2-3 weeks, with some going a month (or longer). Racking only to add flavor elements and/or harvest the yeast cake.

The entire 'need to rack to secondary' discussion is rather lengthy. From my understanding, a decade (or more) ago, it was advised due to poor yeast and other elements making it a good thing. These days, with improvements in yeast (especially liquid yeast) and other things, it's really not needed. If anything, your brew will improve with more time in primary.

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Old 01-19-2011, 03:24 PM   #8
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After reading Chris White's book I'm not even sure it is dormant. Flocc'ing is simply the yeast clumping together. That is how it forms the Krausen. Certainly we don't think of the Krausen as dormant. Flocc'ing/clumping makes it heavier and more prone to sinking. Nowhere in his book does he say the yeast is dormant just because it flocced out. If it truly all went dormant then there would be no such thing as autolysis.


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Revvy beat me to the reply...

I've left a brew in primary for a month without ill effects. If anything it's better with the longer time on the cake. As also mentioned, the yeast isn't dead (it's dormant) after even a month. I don't recall exactly how long it would take for the yeast to actually die off enough to effect the brew, but I can't see us going that long.

Personally, I'm leaving brews in primary for a minimum of 2-3 weeks, with some going a month (or longer). Racking only to add flavor elements and/or harvest the yeast cake.

The entire 'need to rack to secondary' discussion is rather lengthy. From my understanding, a decade (or more) ago, it was advised due to poor yeast and other elements making it a good thing. These days, with improvements in yeast (especially liquid yeast) and other things, it's really not needed. If anything, your brew will improve with more time in primary.
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Old 01-19-2011, 03:59 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermit View Post
After reading Chris White's book I'm not even sure it is dormant. Flocc'ing is simply the yeast clumping together. That is how it forms the Krausen. Certainly we don't think of the Krausen as dormant. Flocc'ing/clumping makes it heavier and more prone to sinking. Nowhere in his book does he say the yeast is dormant just because it flocced out. If it truly all went dormant then there would be no such thing as autolysis.
You do realize how long you'll need to leave the brew on the yeast before you get autoysis to happen, these days??

Eventually, yeast will go dormant in the fermenting wort, once all the sugars for it to feed on are gone, and there's nothing left for it to munch (or do)... Only chance you have of really 'killing' yeast is to put it into a high enough ABV solution that exceeds it's tolerance level. With beer, that's not easy to do (with modern/current yeasts)... You can get it to happen in mead/wine where the yeast will keep going until it's made enough alcohol that it's beyond it's capacity to survive...

If you're really paranoid about autolysis, then you can always cold crash the brew after a few weeks, or month, and then rack off if you want to age it longer.

There are plenty of people (posting on these boards) that have left their brews fermenting for several weeks (or longer) without any ill effects... Perhaps this is another benefit from going all grain, over extract brewing (just a thought)...

Bottom line, a little yeast hitching a ride over to secondary won't be the end of the world for the brew. If you're REALLY concerned, then give it a week (or two) and rack it again, being sure to leave any traces of the yeast cake behind.
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Old 01-19-2011, 04:09 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Golddiggie View Post
You do realize how long you'll need to leave the brew on the yeast before you get autoysis to happen, these days??

Eventually, yeast will go dormant in the fermenting wort, once all the sugars for it to feed on are gone, and there's nothing left for it to munch (or do)... Only chance you have of really 'killing' yeast is to put it into a high enough ABV solution that exceeds it's tolerance level. With beer, that's not easy to do (with modern/current yeasts)... You can get it to happen in mead/wine where the yeast will keep going until it's made enough alcohol that it's beyond it's capacity to survive...

If you're really paranoid about autolysis, then you can always cold crash the brew after a few weeks, or month, and then rack off if you want to age it longer.

There are plenty of people (posting on these boards) that have left their brews fermenting for several weeks (or longer) without any ill effects... Perhaps this is another benefit from going all grain, over extract brewing (just a thought)...

Bottom line, a little yeast hitching a ride over to secondary won't be the end of the world for the brew. If you're REALLY concerned, then give it a week (or two) and rack it again, being sure to leave any traces of the yeast cake behind.
I simply stated that the yeast at the bottom may not be dormant according to my understanding of Chris White's book. That is why leaving it on the cake is now considered the right thing to do.
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