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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > Blending strains; separate or together?
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Old 06-16-2010, 04:43 AM   #1
kidsmoke
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Default Blending strains; separate or together?

I'm thinking about doing a batch of beer with Wyeast 1762 and 3711 (Abbey II and French Saison, respectively). I love the pepper notes I get from the 3711 and also the light fruity/floral notes from 1762 and thought they'd go great together.

My question is how should I blend them together, separate fermentation or together in the same beer?

I've been leaning towards two strains in one beer given both strains are in similar temperature ranges and the room I'm fermenting fluctuates between 70-74. But I've heard using two yeast strains may just let one strain dominate. Which would be pointless in blending the two yeast.

On the other hand, I could ferment the beer in a split batch and then blend them together. My worries are that I'll have to managing two different fermeters which is a pain as I due most of my fermenting in my basement.

My recipe will probably be 90% pilsner with roughly 10% wheat malt for head retention. The target OG will be around 1.056 I'll be hopping with a low AAU noble hop with the target IBUs being around 20.

What are other people's experiences with either using multiple yeast in a single batch or blending together split batches?

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Old 06-17-2010, 05:23 AM   #2
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I've done multiple yeast strains probably 6 times now. You will definately get contributions from each strain. One overpowering the other won't happen until a few generations down the road.

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Old 06-17-2010, 07:06 PM   #3
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So, when you've done your multiple yeast strains, how did you combine them? Did you do two separate starters and throw them in at the same time? Or did you throw one in first, and the other a bit later?

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Old 06-18-2010, 01:27 AM   #4
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I ended up making two separate starters and then pitching them together; with a 30 min delay between the two of them. (No real rational reason for the delay...but it sounded good in my head. )

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Old 06-18-2010, 04:30 AM   #5
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Did you just do this? Please report back with results when you have them.

I would be really interested in performing an experiment sometime: split a wort into 3 fermentors. Put one yeast in the first, the other yeast in the second, and then a mixture of both in the third. I think that would be a great way of determining the effect. Unfortunately, I don't have enough fermentors and have other priorities.

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Old 07-27-2010, 03:08 AM   #6
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I'm just trying a bottle or two of the blend of two yeast. The first one (pulled after 1 week) showed little contribution from the 1762 to the flavor profile. It tasted more saison-y (peppery, slightly phenolic) to me than anything else. Which is strange because throughout fermentation it smelled like the 1762 was dominating with the classic sulfury/cherry flavors coming from the airlock.

this recent bottle (two weeks since bottling) showed that it was still saison-y yet the 1762 comes in the end with the signature rochefort-esque flavor coming at the end. it's barely there, but it's there.

I'm not too surprised by the results as the 1762 didn't show any signs of life right until I was about to pitch it, while the 3711 was at full krausen before I pitched. I'd like to see how these two would fair if I had healthy starters of both from fresh packets.

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