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Old 12-05-2013, 02:24 PM   #11
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you absolutely can use a 5L flask for 2L starters! i also use mine as the fermenter for 4L test batches, where i do a mini-BIAB in a kitchen pot on the stovetop, and i use it when i split a batch for different yeasts or to add different fruits or dry hops. what i'm saying is that it's useful for stuff other than a giant starter. but yeah also expensive and fairly fragile. 5L jugs are cheaper but usually don't hold a stirbar well
That's a good idea. I'd never thought to use it as a fermenter!
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Old 12-05-2013, 03:40 PM   #12
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Default need flat bottom on vessel

I have tested my new stir plate with different flasks, jugs & growlers. As long at the vessel has a flat bottom (on the interior) the stir bar should stay in place. Some of my 1/2g growlers work. My 1gallon wine jug is not flat enough to hold the bar, but I am always looking for more; hoping to finding one that works.

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Old 12-05-2013, 05:45 PM   #13
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Make the yeast starter in your fermenter. When your wort is chilled, pour or drain off the starter wort, leaving behind the yeast sediment.
Also, why do you think you need to step up to 6 L? Pitching 1 vial or smack pack to 6 L is still overpitching the starter (which is fine).

This article has some info that will hopefully be helpful to you:

http://beerandwinejournal.com/better-yeast-starters/

[Edit: Just to elaborate a bit. A yeast vial contains about 35 mL of yeast slurry, not 35 mL of fermented wort. It has about 100 billion cells. When you step up from a vial, base your pitching rate on the cell count, not the volume. If you had 35 mL of fermented wort, you would need to step it up a couple times to hit 6 L (to 350 mL then 3,500 mL and then up to 6). For 35 mL of yeast slurry (from a larger volume of fermented wort) -- pitch that right to your 6 L starter.]


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Old 12-05-2013, 05:46 PM   #14
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Also, why do you think you need to step up to 6 L? Pitching 1 vial or smack pack to 6 L is still overpitching the starter (which is fine).
Probably because most people don't have stir-plate friendly vessels that size.
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Old 12-05-2013, 06:29 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by VikingChrisColby View Post
Make the yeast starter in your fermenter. When your wort is chilled, pour or drain off the starter wort, leaving behind the yeast sediment.
Also, why do you think you need to step up to 6 L? Pitching 1 vial or smack pack to 6 L is still overpitching the starter (which is fine).

This article has some info that will hopefully be helpful to you:

http://beerandwinejournal.com/better-yeast-starters/

[Edit: Just to elaborate a bit. A yeast vial contains about 35 mL of yeast slurry, not 35 mL of fermented wort. It has about 100 billion cells. When you step up from a vial, base your pitching rate on the cell count, not the volume. If you had 35 mL of fermented wort, you would need to step it up a couple times to hit 6 L (to 350 mL then 3,500 mL and then up to 6). For 35 mL of yeast slurry (from a larger volume of fermented wort) -- pitch that right to your 6 L starter.]


Chris Colby
Editor
beerandwinejournal.com
According to http://yeastcalc.com/ to make 11 gallons of a Lager with an OG of 1.056 I would need 872 Billion yeast cells! If I pitch 1 vial (100 billion cells) with an 89% viability rate (2 week old yeast) I would need about 5.5 L of starter wort using a stir plate for optimum pitching rate. Since I am only going to have a 5L flask for my stir plate I would have to do 2-step starter 2L in the 1st and 3.5L in the second.
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Old 12-05-2013, 06:39 PM   #16
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According to http://yeastcalc.com/ to make 11 gallons of a Lager with an OG of 1.056 I would need 872 Billion yeast cells! If I pitch 1 vial (100 billion cells) with an 89% viability rate (2 week old yeast) I would need about 5.5 L of starter wort using a stir plate for optimum pitching rate. Since I am only going to have a 5L flask for my stir plate I would have to do 2-step starter 2L in the 1st and 3.5L in the second.
You can also play with the gravity of the starter wort, and when using the K. Troester method it'll change the number of yeast cells you get. Jamil's stir plate method doesn't take into account the starter gravity. I wouldn't go too high but maybe bumping it up to 1.040 or so would help bring the size down a bit. Not sure exactly where the limit is where the higher gravity becomes detrimental to yeast health though.
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