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Old 05-31-2011, 12:55 AM   #11
nate_ive
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Does it increase or decrease ester production? I'm shooting for increased production since I like Shipyard. The krausen has fallen but the airlock is still bubbling strong. I will probably take a gravity reading on Thursday.

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Old 05-31-2011, 01:24 PM   #12
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I live in Denver which is a mile above sea level, the atmospheric pressure is less here. Water boils at a lower temperature here then at sea level because of this air pressure difference. The pressure keeping the CO2 in the wort would be less meaning less of the CO2 would stay dissolved in the beer. So my "close" fermentation in Denver probably has less air pressure on in then a closed fermentation at sea level(east coast). Dalton's law of Partial Pressure and the Ideal Gas Equation could be used to calculate this.

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Old 05-31-2011, 02:24 PM   #13
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Open fermentors are usually shallower than closed (conical) fermentors and the shape of the fermentor is said to have an impact on the esters the yeast produce.

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Old 05-31-2011, 03:54 PM   #14
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Thanks for the responses. I'm trying to understand how the shape of the fermenter would affect the ester production. The only difference I can see would be the CO2 produced at the bottom of the fermenter has farther to travel to reach the surface to escape, but my 5 gallon carboy is much more shallow(shorter) then a commercial open fermenter. I have been to Scotland to the whisky distilleries in the Highlands were some of the distilleries tout that the stills are the same shape and and have the same dents and dings as the original stills to make sure the flavor is the same. This still hoodoo is for tourist consumption -- a dent in the still is not going to have a flavor impact --- but grain quality, mash temperature, yeast, and fermentation temp will affect the flavor. This open fermentation feels like the still superstition. My batch's krausen has completely fallen, the airlock is still going strong. I'm probably going to take a gravity reading tonight. I will know what flavors the yeast produced shortly.

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Old 05-31-2011, 04:35 PM   #15
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It increases ester production by increasing access to O2, it's measurable, Sierra Nevada for instance found that they weren't happy with their Kellerweis until they tried an open ferment. Anchor Brewing, Jolly Pumpkin, and Samuel Smith's all use open fermenters. It's helpful if you want to top crop yeast as well.

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Old 05-31-2011, 05:59 PM   #16
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Since CO2 is denser then N2 and O2(major components of air) how does the O2 get into the open fermentation? I remember a simple high school chemistry experiment where we made CO2 in a tall glass by mixing baking soda and vinegar. We then carefully(so as not to spill the liquid) tipped the glass sideways over the top of a burning candle, the flame flickered and when out as the CO2 gas reached the flame. I guess the lag time between putting the wort in the open fermenter and the krausen forming a capping CO2 layer would allow some O2 to dissolve into the wort, but that would be in the parts per billion range. Hmmm, I could probably shake the fermenter for a few seconds a few hours after pitching the yeast to introduce a more O2... Interesting stuff to think about. Thanks everyone.

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Old 06-01-2011, 05:01 PM   #17
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Tasted the Ringwood pale mild last night, the gravity reading was (OG 1.040)1.013. There is a some diacetyl in the finish. It tasted similar to to a lighter Shipyard Export Ale, though it is flat. I'm going to check the gravity again on Thursday. If it is 1.013, I'm going to rack to a secondary, cold crash, and then bottle it on Sunday!

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Old 06-05-2011, 07:40 PM   #18
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I bottled this yesterday. The diacetyl is gone, but it still has the ringwood aroma and flavor --- the priming sugar makes it a little sweet, but it tastes really good. I'm looking forward to trying it when it is all carbonated up.

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