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Gengis 11-03-2011 06:23 PM

best DRY yeast for malty American IPA
 
Hi all,

I am going to brew a gluten-free American-style IPA. I've tried Nottingham in the past, but I find that the high attenuation leaves barely any malty character (it finishes too dry for my taste). Although I'm not a fan of fruity/spicy notes associated with Belgian yeast.

Any suggestion?
Thanks!

asidrane 11-03-2011 06:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gengis (Post 3452498)
Hi all,

I am going to brew a gluten-free American-style IPA. I've tried Nottingham in the past, but I find that the high attenuation leaves barely any malty character (it finishes too dry for my taste). Although I'm not a fan of fruity/spicy notes associated with Belgian yeast.

Any suggestion?
Thanks!

I'm not sure if it is gluten-free, but you might want to check out Safale S-04

Gengis 11-03-2011 07:06 PM

Thanks, but isn't S04 a high-attenuation yeast? I really am looking for residual sweetness (malty finish...).

shecky 11-03-2011 07:08 PM

S-04 is a medium attenuation yeast. It can go crazy at low temps, though. If you're not careful, it will leave a lot of fruitiness behind.

I us S-05 in my IPAs. I also tend to mash higher with 05 as it does really attenuate if you go in the 149-150 range.

KingBrianI 11-03-2011 07:11 PM

Danstar Windsor is known for leaving beer fairly sweet and malty if that's what you're going for. It's supposedly not a great flocculator though.

hamiltont 11-03-2011 07:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gengis (Post 3452651)
Thanks, but isn't S04 a high-attenuation yeast? I really am looking for residual sweetness (malty finish...).

I was going to suggest S-04 myself. Per the Fermentis website S-04 is High floculation and Medium final gravity (Attenuation). Here's the link: http://www.fermentis.com/fo/pdf/HB/E...le_S-04_HB.pdf Cheers!!!

ayoungrad 11-03-2011 07:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shecky (Post 3452661)
S-04 is a medium attenuation yeast. It can go crazy at low temps, though. If you're not careful, it will leave a lot of fruitiness behind.

In your experience, what do you find you get with low temps?

I have only done one batch with S-O4. It came out too fruity for me and I fermented at 63. Is this what you were getting at? I was hoping it was a fluke because I'm going to try another S-O4 batch soon.

shecky 11-03-2011 10:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ayoungrad (Post 3452714)
In your experience, what do you find you get with low temps?

I have only done one batch with S-O4. It came out too fruity for me and I fermented at 63. Is this what you were getting at? I was hoping it was a fluke because I'm going to try another S-O4 batch soon.

Yup, that's what I was getting at. I find the esters aren't as bad a bit higher.

I love S-04. Use it all the time but I make sure the ferment temps don't drop below 65.

Monstar 11-03-2011 10:45 PM

I have been using S04 a LOT recently because of the malty backbone it leaves behind. For a dry yeast, its the best you're gonna get.

denimglen 11-04-2011 07:56 AM

I've just done a side by side of USO5 and SO4 in an IPA.

While O4 does come off as more malty it seemed to wash out the flavour a bit. It didn't accentuate the hops at all - the level of hop aroma was about half as the O5 batch. They were pretty similar at the end of the day but the O5 batch was a lot softer and rounder in flavour.

It's hard to explain but while the O4 batch was maltier the O5 batch had better malt flavour even though it was hoppier overall.

I'd go for SO5 and mash in the high range to leave some residuals.

Hope that helps.


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