Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > Belgian Dark Strong: 84F fermentation temp. What does this mean?!
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 10-04-2013, 04:58 PM   #1
seanppp
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 237
Liked 8 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default Belgian Dark Strong: 84F fermentation temp. What does this mean?!

I got a recipe for a super fruity and and estery Belgian Dark Strong that says the fermentation temp is 84F. So, what does my fermentation profile look like?

For most of my ales, my ferm. schedule is:

Pitch at T-2. Hold 18 hrs.
Increase to T-1. Hold 18 hours.
T-0 until activity slows.
T+1 for 12 hours.
T+2 for 12 hours.
T+3 for 1 day.
T+4 for 1 day.
T+5 for 1 day.
T+6 for 1 day.

With "T" being the ferm temp (usually 68F).

For an 84F ferm temp, should I follow this schedule, or should I start lower and ramp up more dramatically at some point?

__________________
seanppp is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-04-2013, 06:38 PM   #2
Brewbien
Feedback Score: 19 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 616
Liked 138 Times on 99 Posts
Likes Given: 68

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by seanppp View Post
I got a recipe for a super fruity and and estery Belgian Dark Strong that says the fermentation temp is 84F. So, what does my fermentation profile look like?

For most of my ales, my ferm. schedule is:

Pitch at T-2. Hold 18 hrs.
Increase to T-1. Hold 18 hours.
T-0 until activity slows.
T+1 for 12 hours.
T+2 for 12 hours.
T+3 for 1 day.
T+4 for 1 day.
T+5 for 1 day.
T+6 for 1 day.

With "T" being the ferm temp (usually 68F).

For an 84F ferm temp, should I follow this schedule, or should I start lower and ramp up more dramatically at some point?
I usually pitch at normal temps (65-68) and let the temp rise naturally until it peaks, then raise the temp 1* each day until I reach low 80's. Hope that helps.
__________________
Brewbien is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-04-2013, 06:47 PM   #3
bmick
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: New York, NY
Posts: 324
Liked 26 Times on 16 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Belgians are all about the ester profile of the yeast, so with mine i typically pitch at 68 and just let it ride up to 75 for the first 18 hours, then let it free ride as high as it likes. Don't be afraid to let that yeast express itself.

__________________
bmick is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-04-2013, 07:19 PM   #4
TNGabe
Feedback Score: 16 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 6,461
Liked 2166 Times on 1464 Posts
Likes Given: 2138

Default

Depending on what strain you are using, I think 68 is probably too high to pitch. I'd personally pitch at 62-64 and hold it there for the first 24-48 hrs and then let it free rise or even add some heat if you need to help it finish out, but you shouldn't need to push it above mid 70s. I've found you'll get a surprising amount of fusels/higher alcohols and/or unpleasant esters from pitching in the upper 60s with trappist/abbey yeasts.

__________________

Why spend 5 minutes reading when you can just start another thread?

TNGabe is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-04-2013, 07:42 PM   #5
seanppp
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 237
Liked 8 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Thanks for the replies.

I have heard the "let it go" thing before, but the temperature outside your carboy affects what happens in the carboy as well. If it's in a 40F garage, "letting it go" will result in a lower fermentation temp than "letting it go" in a 75F garage.

So either way, what you do affects what happens in the carboy. And the question still stands, a very reputable brewer gave me the info "84F fermentation temperature". What does this mean?

Thanks!

__________________
seanppp is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-04-2013, 08:05 PM   #6
TNGabe
Feedback Score: 16 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 6,461
Liked 2166 Times on 1464 Posts
Likes Given: 2138

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by seanppp View Post
Thanks for the replies.

I have heard the "let it go" thing before, but the temperature outside your carboy affects what happens in the carboy as well. If it's in a 40F garage, "letting it go" will result in a lower fermentation temp than "letting it go" in a 75F garage.

So either way, what you do affects what happens in the carboy. And the question still stands, a very reputable brewer gave me the info "84F fermentation temperature". What does this mean?

Thanks!
I have a hard time imagining a scenario where you could hold a beer at 64 in a 40 degree garage so your 'let it go' scenario is a little flawed, but I understand your point. When I say hold at '64' that's assuming you've got a temp controlled ferm chamber on some sort and you'd let it free rise in there as well.

If you really want to know what the brewer meant, he's probably the one to ask.
__________________

Why spend 5 minutes reading when you can just start another thread?

TNGabe is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-04-2013, 10:51 PM   #7
philosofool
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 89
Liked 11 Times on 7 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

I wouldn't ferment anything that hot to start, and in any event, you need to use the right yeast.

While it is the practice of many homebrewers to ferment their Belgians in the mid to high seventies, this practice in not born-out in that of Trappist and Abbey breweries. Most of them would follow a profile much more like what you described, starting between 64 and 68 and allowing it to rise a little toward the end. Much the opposite of the "let it go" mentality I hear about in the US, Trappist breweries seem to me to be quite fanatical about carefully controlling their fermentation, at least if reports in Brew Like A Monk are to be believed.

I haven't answered you question, have I? My point is that I think you are right to wonder about properly controlling the fermentation of this beer.

__________________
philosofool is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-05-2013, 07:49 AM   #8
seanppp
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 237
Liked 8 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Thanks again for the replies.

Problem is: I still have no idea how to go forth with an 84F fermentation temperature!

__________________
seanppp is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-06-2013, 05:48 PM   #9
tgmartin000
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 984
Liked 62 Times on 50 Posts
Likes Given: 17

Default

Start it at 68 for the first 24 hours. THen let it free rise to 84 over about 2 days. Hold there for a week or so. Use a heat source if you need to.

I did this with a couple recent belgians - a saison and a golden strong - and they both turned out beautifully. I know Jamil recommends starting for the first 24 hours at 68 before letting rise. I think I started at 68, by 12 hours they were at 74, held in the 70's for the next 2 days, then let free rise into the 80's.

What yeast are you using? With proper O2 and pitching rates, the fusels shouldn't be an issue.

__________________
tgmartin000 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-07-2013, 11:00 AM   #10
seanppp
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 237
Liked 8 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Okay! I'm going to try that! 68 for 2 days and then ramp it up. Thanks everybody.

__________________
seanppp is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Stuck Fermentation Belgian Strong Dark/Quad JCrazy84 Fermentation & Yeast 15 12-15-2013 07:36 PM
Shred's "Strong, Dark & Stoopid" Belgian Dark Strong Ale Shred Recipes/Ingredients 0 09-02-2013 03:51 PM
Troubleshooting a Belgian Dark Strong Wy 1762 Fermentation ajfranke Fermentation & Yeast 0 01-20-2012 04:10 PM
question about ramping up fermentation temp for a Belgian Strong zman Fermentation & Yeast 1 10-10-2011 06:33 PM
Belgian Golden Strong Ale Fermentation Temp Schedule Phunhog Fermentation & Yeast 2 11-08-2010 09:15 PM