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-   -   Beer carbonated in the carboy before it was done. (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f163/beer-carbonated-carboy-before-done-166360/)

stever 03-04-2010 02:14 PM

Beer carbonated in the carboy before it was done.
 
I brewed a 10g batch of beer 2 weeks ago and I split it up among two carboys and pitched my yeast. Everything seemed to be going fine except last week when I tested the gravity, one of the carboys was at 1.022 which is much higher than it should have been, the other is still fermenting and now down into the 1.015 range. What I found strange was that there appeared to be a layer of Krausen on the one that was at 1.022 but after another week it still didn't drop a point. So last night I am looking a lot closer to see if I can see any yeast in suspension and I see carbonation bubbles running up the side of the carboy and at that point realize that the white foamy krausen is head. The beer appears to have carbonated in the carboy. The only think I can think of was that there was a blockage in the airlock but after removing the airlock it appeared fine.

My question is what the hell do I do now? Can you still ferment beer that is partially carbonated? I really would like this to be lower than 1.022 because it is going to be entirely too sweet.

GilaMinumBeer 03-04-2010 02:23 PM

Any fermented beverage will partially carbonate to atmospheric pressure prior to offgassing.

Don't sweat it bro.

stever 03-04-2010 02:25 PM

I have noticed a small amount on beers that have finished in the past, but not at this level. Combine the large amounts of co2 with the fact that I need to shave off another 8+ points and I was a little worried.

slowbie 03-04-2010 02:29 PM

It could be that the extra CO2 in suspension is causing artificially high gravity readings.

DavidSteel 03-04-2010 02:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stever (Post 1923439)
I have noticed a small amount on beers that have finished in the past, but not at this level. Combine the large amounts of co2 with the fact that I need to shave off another 8+ points and I was a little worried.

If it is carbonated, maybe the carbonation is just pushing your hydrometer up further than what the gravity is and thus giving off an inaccurate reading. Either way, your gravity is probably staying where it is unless you try to dry it out with corn sugar or something. But who knows, maybe the temp got too cold and the yeast went dormant. If you think that may be the case, then move the carboy to a warmer environment.

mojotele 03-04-2010 02:37 PM

Warming it up will also force some of the CO2 out of the beer.

stever 03-04-2010 02:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DavidSteel (Post 1923451)
If it is carbonated, maybe the carbonation is just pushing your hydrometer up further than what the gravity is and thus giving off an inaccurate reading. Either way, your gravity is probably staying where it is unless you try to dry it out with corn sugar or something. But who knows, maybe the temp got too cold and the yeast went dormant. If you think that may be the case, then move the carboy to a warmer environment.


That is what I did on Monday, I moved it upstairs and also pitched some nottingham but so far nothing. I think you guys might have hit the nail on the head with the gravity reading though. It seems to make sense that you could not get an accurate hydro reading due to the carbonation.

GilaMinumBeer 03-04-2010 02:41 PM

Pull a sample and leave it on the countyer for an hour or two and then take another reading. when you drop the hydro, give it a spin to ensure that no bubbles attach to the hydro and to help release any residula carbonation.

stever 03-04-2010 02:55 PM

great idea gila, I will try that tonight.


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