Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Last Sponsor Giveaway of the Year!

Come Enter the BrewDeals/FastFerment Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > Autolysis faster for high OG brews?
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 08-05-2014, 08:19 PM   #11
broadbill
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Southern Maine
Posts: 3,404
Liked 320 Times on 224 Posts
Likes Given: 222

Default

The think the simple route is not put them in cold storage and let them age/bottle condition however they go. There isn't any reason to expect them to over-carbonate assuming they aren't infected or you over-dosed with priming sugar.

__________________
broadbill is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-06-2014, 12:04 AM   #12
WoodlandBrew
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
WoodlandBrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Malden, MA
Posts: 1,772
Liked 124 Times on 121 Posts
Likes Given: 57

Default

You may find this post relevant. It's the effect of ABV on yeast viability.

http://www.woodlandbrew.com/2013/01/...-on-yeast.html

__________________

The 2nd edition is now available: Brewing Engineering
Woodland Brewing Research Blog Applied Science for Better Beer.

WoodlandBrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-08-2014, 02:25 PM   #13
Bryan_85
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 25
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodlandBrew View Post
You may find this post relevant. It's the effect of ABV on yeast viability.

http://www.woodlandbrew.com/2013/01/...-on-yeast.html
thanks WoodlandBrew, that's interesting. I was surprised by how high the death rate was for the higher ABV solutions. Of course it'll vary by yeast, but how is this reconciled with the fact that most ppl who brew barley wines bottle condition for months? It seems like after 2 weeks, very little additional carbonation would occur...? Maybe the answer is that high-ABV beers are traditionally force carbonated (instead of bottle carbonated)?
__________________
Bryan_85 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-09-2014, 09:13 PM   #14
WoodlandBrew
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
WoodlandBrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Malden, MA
Posts: 1,772
Liked 124 Times on 121 Posts
Likes Given: 57

Default

Good questions! I can't give you a complete answer. Yes, alcohol tolerance will vary a little bit from strain to strain, but for the most part they are all about the same. It would be interesting to preform this test on a yeast that has been bread for high alcohol tolerance. Most of the carbonation will occur within the first week. The months of conditioning time will mostly help the flavors mellow, blend, and mature.

__________________

The 2nd edition is now available: Brewing Engineering
Woodland Brewing Research Blog Applied Science for Better Beer.

WoodlandBrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-09-2014, 09:26 PM   #15
Beernik
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: salt lake city, ut
Posts: 3,167
Liked 337 Times on 277 Posts
Likes Given: 25

Default

A lot of big ABV beers that are bottle carbed and conditioned have a second pitching of fresh yeast.

If you don't pitch fresh yeast, it's like asking someone to do 50 push-ups after running a marathon. Of course it's going to take longer than if they only jogged a quarter mile.

__________________
People tell me that if they lived near a beach they would run on the beach every day.

If I lived near a beach, I'd drink beer and look at the beach every day.
Beernik is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-12-2014, 07:40 PM   #16
Bryan_85
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 25
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Beernik View Post
A lot of big ABV beers that are bottle carbed and conditioned have a second pitching of fresh yeast.

If you don't pitch fresh yeast, it's like asking someone to do 50 push-ups after running a marathon. Of course it's going to take longer than if they only jogged a quarter mile.
...and then the newly pitched yeast do all of the carbonating in the first 2 weeks before they're all dead (in a 12% beer), I guess?
__________________
Bryan_85 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-12-2014, 07:44 PM   #17
Bryan_85
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 25
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodlandBrew View Post
Good questions! I can't give you a complete answer. Yes, alcohol tolerance will vary a little bit from strain to strain, but for the most part they are all about the same. It would be interesting to preform this test on a yeast that has been bread for high alcohol tolerance. Most of the carbonation will occur within the first week. The months of conditioning time will mostly help the flavors mellow, blend, and mature.
The link posted above did not give me the impression that the tested solutions were bottled. If that's true, does anyone have an intuition as to which way the bottle environment (higher pressure, less oxygen, ...) would affect yeast death rate: faster or slower?
__________________
Bryan_85 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
OG Always high on my brews Whipskipper All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 5 06-21-2013 08:08 PM
I want all of my brews to be high ABV% onthedot General Beer Discussion 5 10-06-2011 09:55 PM
yeast strains carbonate faster if they floc faster? leoglenwood All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 1 02-18-2010 08:53 PM
Conditioning High ABV Brews Killinger General Techniques 5 10-31-2007 09:43 PM
High % ABV/ABW Brews mizzoueng Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 02-14-2007 08:47 PM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS