Electric Brewing Supply 30A BCS Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > Anybody tried this?
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 10-13-2012, 03:47 PM   #1
Darren231
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Traverse City, Michigan
Posts: 13
Default Anybody tried this?

I wanted to reuse my yeast from a previous batch which had been dry hopped. I finished batch sparging, boiled and cooled to 60 in 25 minutes. In an effort to clean up the yeast I pumped the cooled wort into the now cooled spent grain, added the slop from the bottom of the previous fermenting buckets and recirculated all for about 20 minutes using the grain bed as a filter to remove the old hops and drub. It's now fermenting quite nicely. I ended up priming and kegging the first batch with the new unfermented beer. Did I have too many while brewing late night?

__________________
Darren231 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-13-2012, 03:56 PM   #2
Johnnyhitch1
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 31 reviews
 
Johnnyhitch1's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: SiX-ThReE-OnE, NY
Posts: 2,043
Liked 221 Times on 185 Posts
Likes Given: 3353

Default

i dont see the point in running it back thru your MT.
just boil some water, cool and pitch into your old yeast cake. swirl. pour into a jar and wait 10 min for hop and trub to drop pour off yeasty solution into another jar and cold crash that, decant liquid and use for starter or if harvested enough slurry pitch directly into you FV.

also IIRC malted barley contains trace amounts of lacto on its shells. Hope you didnt just sour your batch....

__________________
^~~ "Like" it, Ill Give you beer ~~^
(({Brewing for the Movement Within}))

Primary: Kicking Cans DIPA, ECY20 Golden sour.
Kegged: Conan the Brown, OBS (Oatmeal brett stout)
Aging: Flanders Red w/ ECY02, All out Brett.
BOTTLES:

Cider: Grapfelwine, Apfelwine, Cranfelwine, Applejack
Beer: NZ Brett (BD:9/16/12)
Mead: Blueberry-lemon, Raspberry-Lime, Habenero, POM, Traditional.
Cellar: Maple Whiskey Barrel Stout, ST Pumking Clone
Johnnyhitch1 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-13-2012, 04:52 PM   #3
dzlater
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 1,048
Liked 27 Times on 26 Posts
Likes Given: 118

Default

You pitched the yeast, and then ran the wort through the grain bed into the fermenter?
That can't be good.
If this beer doesn't turn out sour, I'll be amazed.

__________________
dzlater is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-13-2012, 05:17 PM   #4
Darren231
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Traverse City, Michigan
Posts: 13
Default

I guess I'm confused as to what would sour the batch. The grain was in effect pasteurized. I'm pretty sure from what I see the yeast is way out in front of any lacto. I guess my hazy logic drew me to this course with #1 getting a bit more sugar off those grains and #2 trying to use the grain bed as a filter by recirculating. I'll let you guys know what happens.

__________________
Darren231 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-13-2012, 05:35 PM   #5
Johnnyhitch1
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 31 reviews
 
Johnnyhitch1's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: SiX-ThReE-OnE, NY
Posts: 2,043
Liked 221 Times on 185 Posts
Likes Given: 3353

Default

in what way did you pasteurize the grains after mashing?
look up "sour mash" essentially its leaving a hot sticky thick environment letting lacto reproduce like in a berliner weiss let the lacto get to souring first without the ale yeast eating all sugars.

your prob gonna be fine in the long run if ferm took off so vigorous. watch for a pellicle during the end of primary.

__________________
^~~ "Like" it, Ill Give you beer ~~^
(({Brewing for the Movement Within}))

Primary: Kicking Cans DIPA, ECY20 Golden sour.
Kegged: Conan the Brown, OBS (Oatmeal brett stout)
Aging: Flanders Red w/ ECY02, All out Brett.
BOTTLES:

Cider: Grapfelwine, Apfelwine, Cranfelwine, Applejack
Beer: NZ Brett (BD:9/16/12)
Mead: Blueberry-lemon, Raspberry-Lime, Habenero, POM, Traditional.
Cellar: Maple Whiskey Barrel Stout, ST Pumking Clone
Johnnyhitch1 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-13-2012, 05:54 PM   #6
jfr1111
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Quebec, Quebec
Posts: 1,540
Liked 56 Times on 49 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Yeah, don't recirculate fresh cool wort in spent grains as was said. I hope you like sour beers.

__________________
jfr1111 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-13-2012, 05:58 PM   #7
Darren231
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Traverse City, Michigan
Posts: 13
Default

The grains had been at 154F for 90 min with a 170F Batch sparge. They dropped to about 110F in the time it took to boil and chill. I added the wort and continued counterflow chilling while recirculating to get it down to 70. Cooling took less then 5 minutes. I then pitched yeast. I would refer to the mash and sparge as the pasteurization.

__________________
Darren231 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-13-2012, 06:11 PM   #8
jfr1111
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Quebec, Quebec
Posts: 1,540
Liked 56 Times on 49 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Darren231 View Post
The grains had been at 154F for 90 min with a 170F Batch sparge. They dropped to about 110F in the time it took to boil and chill. I added the wort and continued counterflow chilling while recirculating to get it down to 70. Cooling took less then 5 minutes. I then pitched yeast. I would refer to the mash and sparge as the pasteurization.
A sour mash, where a mash is left to stand for a day or more to sour, usually uses a mash out step in order to lock in the fermentability of the wort: lacto is still very much present after a mash out step.
__________________
jfr1111 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-13-2012, 07:16 PM   #9
Darren231
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Traverse City, Michigan
Posts: 13
Default

I started looking at some other threads and they stated that 99% of lactobacillus is killed after 5 minutes at 150F. I obviously far exceeded that during mash and sparge. I also had a pretty healthy collection of viable yeast I added. The ferment is boiling. Not trying to be defensive...just attempting to figure out where all these bacteria would theoretically come from.

__________________
Darren231 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-13-2012, 07:22 PM   #10
Denny
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Eugene OR
Posts: 4,292
Liked 438 Times on 331 Posts
Likes Given: 530

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dzlater View Post
You pitched the yeast, and then ran the wort through the grain bed into the fermenter?
That can't be good.
If this beer doesn't turn out sour, I'll be amazed.
Agreed.
__________________

Life begins at 60....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

http://www.experimentalbrew.com - the website for the book "Experimental Homebrewing"...coming Nov. 2014

Denny is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools