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-   -   Ancient yeast revived, amazing! (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f163/ancient-yeast-revived-amazing-306119/)

solavirtus 02-20-2012 05:34 PM

Ancient yeast revived, amazing!
 
I had to share: the recent recovery of yeast from jars of fermented chicha in Equador. New species of yeast, and not Sacch! How long til While Labs is selling it? :mug:

http://io9.com/5886505/researchers-r...nt-andean-tomb

http://www.scientificamerican.com/ar...nt-andean-tomb

Yuri_Rage 02-20-2012 05:36 PM

Fascinating concept, but I doubt anyone's going to be interested in fermenting with Candida strains...

solavirtus 02-20-2012 05:38 PM

Probably not, but looks like it worked for the Inca. I just find it incredible that they could recover viable cells after all this time, it's not like it was frozen or anything.

manoaction 02-21-2012 08:44 PM

I’m betting that Dogfish Head agents are on a plane with blank petri dishes on their way to Ecuador right now.

H-ost 02-21-2012 08:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by manoaction (Post 3813350)
Iím betting that Dogfish Head agents are on a plane with blank petri dishes on their way to Ecuador right now.

HAH probably true.

Revvy 02-21-2012 08:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by manoaction (Post 3813350)
I’m betting that Dogfish Head agents are on a plane with blank petri dishes on their way to Ecuador right now.

LOL.Chicha Batch Two coming to a brewpub near you. ;)

I thought those guys at DFH figured it was some form of amalyse that did the work on chicha not actual yeast. Interesting.

dbsmith 02-21-2012 08:52 PM

"These findings confirm 16th-century reports of how indigenous people in the Ecuadorian Andes fermented their chicha. According to Spanish chroniclers, Inca Indians initiated fermentation using animal bones, human saliva and even human feces."
...
"The most closely related species to C. theae are C. orthopsilosis, C. metapsilosis and C. parapsilosis, all of which are found in human saliva and feces," Carvajal says. Indeed he found human-associated C. parapsilosis, along with C. tropicalis, among the community of yeast in the ancient fermentation vessels. C. parapsilosis is the second-most commonly isolated pathogenic species of Candida infecting people. "Also [there are] the Crytococcus saitoi and C. laurentii that are related to respiratory diseases. They [the Quitus] were chewing and spitting the corn [into the fermentation vessels], so we can assume this population probably had some respiratory problems caused by pathogenic yeasts."

YUCK...my oh my have we come a long way.

Revvy 02-21-2012 08:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dbsmith (Post 3813379)
"... even human feces."

Oh god. Jenkem is NOT an urban myth? URP.

bernerbrau 02-21-2012 08:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Yuri_Rage (Post 3808205)
Fascinating concept, but I doubt anyone's going to be interested in fermenting with Candida strains...

The Kombucha SCOBY contains some Candida... mmm....

HerbieHowells 02-21-2012 09:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by manoaction (Post 3813350)
Iím betting that Dogfish Head agents are on a plane with blank petri dishes on their way to Ecuador right now.

He's got a two day head start on you, which is more than he needs. Calagione's got friends in every town and village from here to the Sudan, he speaks a dozen languages, knows every local custom, he'll blend in, disappear, you'll never see him again. With any luck, he's got the yeast already.


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