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Old 01-29-2010, 10:53 PM   #1
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Default Almost afraid of using 3787!

I have a tripel scheduled for tomorrow so during the week I have been growing the yeast in stepped up starters. I am using WYeast 3787 High Gravity Trappist. Yesterday I put it in a growler that was a tad over half full and it was bubbling away happily before work. Coming home tonight I find that it overflowed with yeast all over the towel I had wrapping it! I looked into the strain on here and see it is famous for a very violent and vigorous fermentation. I may just fill the carboy to the 3.5 gallon mark until the main fermentation is done and top it off. Is there any concern of oxidizing the beer if I were to do this? I also see it is good to incrementally feed it more sugar (planning on doing 2 feedings of 1 lb sugar in a boiled pint of water each time). Would I be concerned with splashing the wort when I pour these in? Thanks!

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Old 01-30-2010, 12:00 AM   #2
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I may just fill the carboy to the 3.5 gallon mark until the main fermentation is done and top it off. Is there any concern of oxidizing the beer if I were to do this? I also see it is good to incrementally feed it more sugar
That is a great yeast! I have used it a lot and it produces some really exceptional flavors as long as you don't ferment too warm. I have even used the blowoff from one batch to ferment another smaller batch.

If you are brewing a 5 gallon batch, brew all 5 gallons and ferment it all the way through. This yeast does create a lot of blowoff, but as long as you have a good 6 inches of headspace you will be fine. I have fermented 5 gallon quads in 6.5 gallon carboys using this yeast and all turned out fine. Though, I think the key here is keeping your temperature under control to keep both the blowoff and the flavor profile in check.
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Old 01-30-2010, 12:39 AM   #3
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6 inches of headspace. Got it. All I have is a 5 gallon carboy though so I will give it some room and and fill in the space during the feedings. Any idea on the possibility of getting oxygen into the beer when feeding it?

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Old 01-30-2010, 12:52 AM   #4
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Yeah be sure to have a good sized blowoff tube -you DO NOT want that thing to get clogged.

Also, while you don't have to do incremental feedings to get this yeast to fully attenuate, this yeast does tolerate them pretty well. The key is to adding them when fermentation is very active and not after the main fermentation ends. When I do this, I will usually do one sugar addition around 36hrs into fermentation and keep the temp around 65-68F. I have got great attenuation from this yeast, it consistently takes my belgian dark strong from around 1.090 to 1.010 or lower. Also, don't be afraid to leave the beer in the primary for 3 weeks or so. This yeast cleans up wonderfully.

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Old 01-30-2010, 01:27 PM   #5
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Right now I have a small blow off tube that fits into the rubber stopper. That may not be enough if it is too vigorous. I think it is a 3/8th tubing that will fit pretty well into the top of a carboy, I may visit the hardware store this morning! I am excited to get the ball rolling and luckily have enough session beer on hand that this tripel can take it's time.

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Old 01-31-2010, 12:17 PM   #6
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When you boil your sugar water you will remove most of the oxygen from it. So just use care to avoid lots of splashing when you pour it in and you'll have no fear of adding oxygen. If you are really worried about it you could rack your sugar water into the carboy and not add any oxygen at all but that's probably going over board/ unnecessary. In other words: no worries!

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Old 01-31-2010, 04:32 PM   #7
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"Right now I have a small blow off tube that fits into the rubber stopper. That may not be enough if it is too vigorous. I think it is a 3/8th tubing that will fit pretty well into the top of a carboy"

I have used this configuration (3/8" tubing, airlock sans interior and top cap, #10 stopper & growler full of StarSan) and it works great. It has handled the most violent fermentations (currently I have Wyeast Am Ale II churning like mad through a Pliny clone). I have also used a larger diameter tubing with a milk jug but since I am using 6 gal BB's that setup does not provide a tight fit with the tubing + carboy.

Just have to make certain that the airlock neck that goes down into the rubber stopper does not become clogged with trub. You will know it is clogged if you see liquid bubbling in the neck of the airlock. Simply remove it (be ready for the CO2 blast), unclog the tip of the airlock, and spray it with StarSan (sanitizer). Put it back into the stopper and you are back in business. Montanaandy

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Old 01-31-2010, 04:42 PM   #8
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"This yeast does create a lot of blowoff, but as long as you have a good 6 inches of headspace you will be fine."

I would say that you normally don't want to intentionally leave 6" of head space because it can cause potential problems. With yeasts/brews known to produce violent (i.e Irish Ale, Trappist, if corn sugar has been added, etc.) I fill the carboy up and leave as little airspace as possible hence the blow off tubing. With a beer that is going to violently ferment like the one you are brewing I personally try to fill my 6 gal BB's with at least 5.5 gal if possible (If I have the wort). I always end up losing a considerable amount of wort to blow off and if you go into the fermentation with a 6" gap you can subsequently end up with too much headspace which can potentially invite a host of problems. Montanaandy

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Old 01-31-2010, 05:02 PM   #9
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I would add some fermcap to the primary in order to minimize the potential for blowoff/amount of blowoff. But keep the blowoff tube in there just in case, because that yeast can be a beast even with fermcap.

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Old 01-31-2010, 05:56 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Montanaandy View Post
"This yeast does create a lot of blowoff, but as long as you have a good 6 inches of headspace you will be fine."

I would say that you normally don't want to intentionally leave 6" of head space because it can cause potential problems. With yeasts/brews known to produce violent (i.e Irish Ale, Trappist, if corn sugar has been added, etc.) I fill the carboy up and leave as little airspace as possible hence the blow off tubing. With a beer that is going to violently ferment like the one you are brewing I personally try to fill my 6 gal BB's with at least 5.5 gal if possible (If I have the wort). I always end up losing a considerable amount of wort to blow off and if you go into the fermentation with a 6" gap you can subsequently end up with too much headspace which can potentially invite a host of problems. Montanaandy
uh, what are you talking about? too much headspace is NOT a problem
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