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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > All grain starter?
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Old 08-31-2013, 05:17 AM   #1
will_rouse
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Default All grain starter?

Well I'm brewing Monday and I'm out of DME. So, I plan on making a starter out of two row.
Just to be safe Im double checking the process I couldn't find a thread.
-1lb of 2 row
-1 gallon of water
-get water on stove 152 degrees
-put grain in paint strainer put in for 45 minutes
- squeeze bag out
-cool down to 70
-continue on like a normal starter

Does this process look right? Any tweaks anyone might have? This will be my first starter also

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Old 08-31-2013, 06:07 AM   #2
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That sounds about right. What I do is make more wort so I can freeze it for future starters. Saves a lot of time that way. And I always have frozen wort around.

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Old 08-31-2013, 01:20 PM   #3
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Never done this so am not speaking from experience. Would you need to heat the water higher than 152 F since the grain bag will lower your temp when you put it in?

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Old 08-31-2013, 01:40 PM   #4
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Default 6-Pack Starter….

By far the most efficient way I have found to make a “starter” is to brew a small 1 gallon batch. Not only do you get your yeast starter inherently you get a six pack out of the deal! Yay! More beer! Yay! Seriously though, brewing a one gallon batch not only allows the opportunity to brew small, you get the additional opportunity to experiment, hone your skills, and sample your creation. The amount of ingredients needed, time spent brewing small, chilling small, fermenting small, and bottling small is so nominal that it really does become super fun…again. I pulled the whole concept from here <link below>


Cheers,

-jms
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Old 08-31-2013, 03:15 PM   #5
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I do this all the time... 1lb base malt and 2quarts and 2 cups of cold water. Pour crushed grain in strainer bag and then set in pot. Add water, then heat and stir until temp is 151 and then let it sit for 45 minutes to an hour. Remove strainer bag and squeeze. Then boil and cool and add to flask with liquid yeast in it.

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Old 08-31-2013, 03:31 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ManhattanProjectBrewing
By far the most efficient way I have found to make a “starter” is to brew a small 1 gallon batch. Not only do you get your yeast starter inherently you get a six pack out of the deal! Yay! More beer! Yay! Seriously though, brewing a one gallon batch not only allows the opportunity to brew small, you get the additional opportunity to experiment, hone your skills, and sample your creation. The amount of ingredients needed, time spent brewing small, chilling small, fermenting small, and bottling small is so nominal that it really does become super fun…again. I pulled the whole concept from here <link below>

Video Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZ7ZlILvTYM

Cheers,

-jms
Sounds good, but wouldn't the starter them be hopped? This may reduce vitality of the yeast - especially if the 6-pack was a hoppy beer.
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Old 08-31-2013, 05:04 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyDoctor View Post
Sounds good, but wouldn't the starter them be hopped? This may reduce vitality of the yeast - especially if the 6-pack was a hoppy beer.
The "starter" in question is actually a small (1 gallon) batch of beer that is fermented to final attenuation (Intended to bottle / drink). The dregs [slurry] in the 1 gallon fermenter are what are used as the "starter" in the next batch. I simply schedule my next brew day (Larger 6 - 12 gallon batch) in line with the racking / bottling day of the previous smaller "starter" batch. The dregs are essentially the starter for the next bigger batch; they can also be saved in a sanitized container in the fridge for a week or so until you are ready for the bigger batch. Make sense?

This way I get to experiment with flavors / various recipes in a smaller batch (Saves time, money, sanity, etc.) and still be able to enjoy my efforts instead of tossing the beer out (I only use the yeast slurry anyways if I make a fresh starter. I throw out the beer if using the typical process [DME] of making a starter).

By doing a smaller batch I get good drinkable beer AND a starter for my next batch. It’s a win-win in that game!

Cheers,

-jms
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