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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > air lock not bubbling and sludge at the bottom of my first brew! what do i do?
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Old 03-04-2012, 06:26 PM   #1
treybrew
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Default air lock not bubbling and sludge at the bottom of my first brew! what do i do?

I starred brewing a harvest nut brown 3 days ago so it has been in the fermenting bucket for almost 30 hours now and it hasn't bubbled like I've read it should and there is a light tan colored sediment at the bottom? Im not sure whats wrong or whats happening i did everything by the book and all ingredients exact? Any ideas this is my first shot at brewing so any advice will help.

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Old 03-04-2012, 07:01 PM   #2
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I'm new too, and no expert. I had great anxiety over what you are now dealing with. However, I'm still curious about your method. I brewed my first ever batch from a kit about 2wks ago, and just transferred to a secondary carboy a few days ago. Did you use a kit? Sanitize? Dry/liquid yeast? Sprinkle dry yeast into wort? Pitch yeast at a cool temp?

I went the hard way and overboard on being careful with equipment and extra steps. I just brewed my second batch yesterday, and it started activity in under 3hrs. 18hrs later, it is now a carnival in the carboy.

Every book, forum, and article I've read emphasizes yeast and sanitation. I pulled the dry yeast from the fridge before I started and let it warm to room temp. When the wort came off the heat, I rehydrated in 1L boiled/cooled water @ 99°F in a glass flask. After I got the wort chilled to 82°F and aerated, it went into the 6.5gal carboy. Then I chilled the yeast to 82° by putting the flask into a bowl of cold tap water. Then I poured it into the carboy, put a stopper/airlock on and placed it on the counter.

All this was not in the instructions. I've been reading two books and various forums before and in between my two attempts. I did not realize how complicated in CAN get become of you study it enough...

From what I've read, the yeast may have been damaged somewhere along the way. I would think that less than perfect sanitation would still allow for fermentation to begin if not complete.

I say don't give up and try again, but review your steps this next attempt.

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Old 03-04-2012, 07:02 PM   #3
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The brown stuff on the bottom is called Trub which just proteins and yeast. If you did not do a yeast starter. It may take up to 72 hours before you see any airlock movement or movement form the yeast. Just a little more, just because the air lock is doing anything it could still be fermenting. Check your bucket lid and airlock. Make sure it is air tight. Dont worry your still making a great brew. The first couple brew sessions seem like everything is going wrong. But in fact its going the way it should. As the saying goes RDWHAHB - Relax, Don't Worry, Have a Homebrew.

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Old 03-04-2012, 07:05 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cysis View Post
IEvery book, forum, and article I've read emphasizes yeast and sanitation. I pulled the dry yeast from the fridge before I started and let it warm to room temp. When the wort came off the heat, I rehydrated in 1L boiled/cooled water @ 99°F in a glass flask. After I got the wort chilled to 82°F and aerated, it went into the 6.5gal carboy. Then I chilled the yeast to 82° by putting the flask into a bowl of cold tap water. Then I poured it into the carboy, put a stopper/airlock on and placed it on the counter.

.
You should cool the wort to 70F, 82 is a high temp to pitch in. Possibility of killing the yeast is greater. Pitch at 70F
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Old 03-04-2012, 07:26 PM   #5
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70°F IS better. I ended up at 82° after topping off with freezer-chilled water. I chilled the kettle wort to 145° when I mixed it. I guess I should have put the bucket in the tub afterwards. Either way, there's always next time to correct these missteps. I was so focused on matching temps.



image-713905332.jpg

Here we are at 20hrs after inoculation. The clumps are swimming around(so weird to watch).

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Old 03-04-2012, 07:35 PM   #6
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But so great at the same time. I just stare and watch, If you dont have a chiller just do an ice bath to get the wort to 70F.

ps: your fermenter looks awesome now I miss mine.

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Old 03-04-2012, 07:36 PM   #7
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You should cool the wort to 70F, 82 is a high temp to pitch in. Possibility of killing the yeast is greater. Pitch at 70F


He's cooling down properly rehydrated yeast from 90-82, how's 82 more likely to kill his yeast? You want your cooled wort and yeast to be within about 10 or fewer degrees of each other for flavor purposes, but it seems unlikely that he's risking yeast death for dry yeast at those temps.
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Old 03-04-2012, 07:42 PM   #8
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He's cooling down properly rehydrated yeast from 90-82, how's 82 more likely to kill his yeast? You want your cooled wort and yeast to be within about 10 or fewer degrees of each other for flavor purposes, but it seems unlikely that he's risking yeast death for dry yeast at those temps.
I have read over and over that anything higher than 70 is always at risk of killing yeast. Unless there is a difference in yeast dry/liquid? I could be wrong but 70 is a good practice. I do 70F only no higher sometimes lower 68ish. I never use dry so maybe dry yeast need higher temps?
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Old 03-04-2012, 07:47 PM   #9
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Nottingham, for example, is instructed to be proofed in water between 90-95 F. It seems unlikely that dry yeast manufacturers are telling us to kill our yeast before pitching.

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Old 03-04-2012, 07:51 PM   #10
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Some fermenter buckets don't seal well enough to force the CO2 through the airlock. Normally not a problem.

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