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-   -   Aeration Experiment (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f163/aeration-experiment-387997/)

Aa760 02-07-2013 05:31 AM

Aeration Experiment
 
Greetings HBT- our local brew club is looking for a talk on oxidation and aeration for an upcoming meeting (2 months out). I am interested in researching this topic for presentation and specifically am thinking a drinkable "experiment" would make this an interesting talk. I was thinking, to get a better feel for proper aeration levels and their effect on finished beer, that I could make a basic ale recipe and break it into separate fermenters: 1: smooth transfer to carboy, no aeration, 2: splashing through funnel into carboy, 3: shaking in carboy, 10 minutes, 4: oxygenation: 20 seconds, 5: oxygenation' 60 seconds. (Both oxygenation iterations would be with pure O2). Thoughts, comments, etc? I am having problem visualizing where I could run fermentation- not enough room in my converted, temperature controlled wine fridge/fermentation chamber. I am thinking I would have this fermentation relegated to the closet, where ambient temp is 70. Ideas on what style beer (yeast) would be a good candidate for this experiment given those restrictions? Infested in input from HBT before I volunteer for this one. It would be my first go at such a conversation with the club, so I would want to get it right.

AnthonyCB 02-07-2013 10:24 AM

My main suggestion would be to use a repitch of yeast from another fermentation where limited sterols will be an issue, and definitely don't use dry yeast since most of the manufacturers say no additional aeration is necessary with their products.

GrogNerd 02-07-2013 10:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AnthonyCB (Post 4874623)
My main suggestion would be to use a repitch of yeast from another fermentation where limited sterols will be an issue, and definitely don't use dry yeast since most of the manufacturers say no additional aeration is necessary with their products.

this with a neutral yeast in a SMaSH

Aa760 02-07-2013 02:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AnthonyCB
My main suggestion would be to use a repitch of yeast from another fermentation where limited sterols will be an issue, and definitely don't use dry yeast since most of the manufacturers say no additional aeration is necessary with their products.

Good idea- I have a stout sitting on some pacman yeast that is due to finish here in about a week- would that be a good candidate for harvesting?

Aa760 02-07-2013 02:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GrogNerd

this with a neutral yeast in a SMaSH

Yes, a good point- a simple recipe for sure. I haven't done a smash yet, but this would be a good candidate for such a recipe.

GrogNerd 02-07-2013 02:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aa760 (Post 4875187)
Good idea- I have a stout sitting on some pacman yeast that is due to finish here in about a week- would that be a good candidate for harvesting?

think that most would recommend not brewing a lighter beer with yeast harvested from a darker beer, but you're experimenting, go ahead

because it's advancing scientific knowledge

Aa760 02-08-2013 01:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GrogNerd

think that most would recommend not brewing a lighter beer with yeast harvested from a darker beer, but you're experimenting, go ahead

because it's advancing scientific knowledge

I have heard that before, but if I wash it, shouldn't that negate color issues? Other than color transfer from darker wort and grub, are there other issues involved with the whole darker beer yeast to lighter beer yeast!

PintoBean 02-08-2013 01:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aa760 (Post 4878034)

I have heard that before, but if I wash it, shouldn't that negate color issues? Other than color transfer from darker wort and grub, are there other issues involved with the whole darker beer yeast to lighter beer yeast!

If you wash it, no issue.

chumpsteak 02-08-2013 01:24 AM

Nope, just color transfer and possible slight flavor addition from any roasted malts. Flavor would be very slight though.

Bigscience 02-10-2013 04:48 PM

Do you have a flow meter on your O2 setup? If not that could lead to less control on the Oxygenation side of things if time is meant to be the variable.


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