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Old 11-25-2013, 04:18 AM   #1
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Default Acetaldehyde....

Well, after having successfully fermented about 12 ales using a schedule of 7 days each at 62/65/68 degrees, I fermented 2 batches at the same time, one a Northern Brewer Honey Brown ale with US-05 and a Thunderstruck Pumpkin Ale with Nottingham. This time I tightened the schedule to 5 days each at 62/65/68. At bottling, both seemed fine. I used honey for the Honey Brown and corn sugar for the pumpkin ale. Now after 2 weeks + in the bbottles, carbonation is good,

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Old 11-25-2013, 04:20 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnpcook1
Well, after having successfully fermented about 12 ales using a schedule of 7 days each at 62/65/68 degrees, I fermented 2 batches at the same time, one a Northern Brewer Honey Brown ale with US-05 and a Thunderstruck Pumpkin Ale with Nottingham. This time I tightened the schedule to 5 days each at 62/65/68. At bottling, both seemed fine. I used honey for the Honey Brown and corn sugar for the pumpkin ale. Now after 2 weeks + in the bbottles, carbonation is good,
But, I have a slight not of Acetaldehyde. It is hard to taste the spices or honey. My question, what if I shake all the bottles and keep them at room temp? Is it possible the acetaldehyde will be cleaned up? Has anyone had success with this?
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Old 11-25-2013, 04:23 AM   #3
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John, two weeks is pretty young to me, if they're green now wait a couple weeks, it will clean up at room temp. I don't think shaking the bottles is necessary or advisable.

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Old 11-25-2013, 04:35 AM   #4
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Shortening the fermentation time will likely expose more off flavors since the yeast are not getting through their entire cycle. Not sure how easy the cleanup will be in the bottle. I don't think you have enough active yeast to tackle the bottles volume of by-products.

Are you just trying to determine your minimum cycle to produce ale?

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Old 11-25-2013, 04:47 AM   #5
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Primary longer.....MUCH longer.

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Old 11-25-2013, 04:49 AM   #6
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My thinking was, that ive had success with three week fermentations, but had heard so many success stories of two week fermentations for both homebrewers and microbreweries. So, basically it was an experiment. The odd part is, at bottling, I didnt detect any off flavors. Having brewed my first four batches of beer with intense acetaldehyde due to fermentations at too high of temps, ive got a nose for this stuff (and a fermentation chamber ) What wud be the concern associated with shaking the bottles to rouse the yeast and waiting two weeks to clarify?

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Old 11-25-2013, 04:58 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnpcook1 View Post
My thinking was, that ive had success with three week fermentations, but had heard so many success stories of two week fermentations for both homebrewers and microbreweries. So, basically it was an experiment. The odd part is, at bottling, I didnt detect any off flavors. Having brewed my first four batches of beer with intense acetaldehyde due to fermentations at too high of temps, ive got a nose for this stuff (and a fermentation chamber ) What wud be the concern associated with shaking the bottles to rouse the yeast and waiting two weeks to clarify?
No concern. My only thoughts were that with bottling the yeast population is very small and the clean-up might be insufficient...it is certainly worth a try.
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Old 11-25-2013, 09:54 AM   #8
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Quote:
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So, basically it was an experiment. The odd part is, at bottling, I didnt detect any off flavors.
This seems odd to me - from where would the acetaldehyde magically appear..?
Priming-sugar consumption? At what temperature did you bottle-carbonate?
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Old 11-25-2013, 11:59 AM   #9
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Its very weird. Bottled at room temp, 70 ish degrees. Both batches the same day. And the day I bottled the pumpkin ale, it had a great spice profile! My son and I drank glasses of it at room temp. Now, the spices cant be detected 3 weeks later

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Old 11-25-2013, 12:27 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnpcook1
My thinking was, that ive had success with three week fermentations, but had heard so many success stories of two week fermentations for both homebrewers and microbreweries. So, basically it was an experiment. The odd part is, at bottling, I didnt detect any off flavors. Having brewed my first four batches of beer with intense acetaldehyde due to fermentations at too high of temps, ive got a nose for this stuff (and a fermentation chamber ) What wud be the concern associated with shaking the bottles to rouse the yeast and waiting two weeks to clarify?
You can have a <two week turn around on some styles but breweries who are turning beer around less than two weeks are using a large pitch of active yeast, great fermentation control and are filtering the beer to speed things up. Time is money for them and the longer a beer sits in the tank, the less money they make.
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