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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > 4 day old Wheat beer on tap! - without lots of yeast!
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Old 06-29-2010, 08:41 PM   #51
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I would imagine anything the yeast feed on would be smaller than the yeast themselves.

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Old 06-29-2010, 10:19 PM   #52
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Originally Posted by PseudoChef View Post
They are typically packed in a sodium azide solution, which is extremely toxic.
Maybe that is the weird taste you're getting?
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Old 06-30-2010, 02:58 PM   #53
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Quote:
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Maybe that is the weird taste you're getting?
No, the first test batch didn't have it - same tubing. I've got the 2 gal batch still in the carboy - with a different yeast. When this is ready it will let me figure out if it was something about the wort (both taste metallic) or something about the fermentor and/or yeast (carboy version is clean).

In terms of micro/macronutrients, this shouldn't be an issue. I think the size cut off for the tubing is ~10,000 Daltons, so small proteins and dextrins should be able to move in or out. Now there maybe be some proteases secreted by the yeast that won't get out so there may be some bigger proteins in the beer versus a conventional ferment.

No pics yet. I did take some, just no time to upload yet. I've been swamped at work and at home.
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Old 07-03-2010, 06:32 PM   #54
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How about some glass beads in the tube to keep it from floating.

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Old 07-06-2010, 05:24 AM   #55
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To the OP: I may have missed this, but where did you get the pressure relief valves that are set at so low a pressure?

To the community: The sodium azide preservative for the tubing is a little off-putting. My chemistry is really stale, but I wouldn't expect this inorganic salt to bind to the tubing, would it? I would think that a few rinses should get this down to pretty trivial concentrations. We seem to have quite a representation of engineers on this site. Can someone speak to this with authority?

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Old 07-09-2010, 01:30 PM   #56
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I thought I would jump in here after reading the couple of entries about the use of alginate to encase the yeast. One of my other hobbies that at one point I took very seriously is "lifecasting." This involves creating very detailed sculptures from casts made directly off the human body (http://jean-paulart.com/lifecasting.htm). I use alginate in the first layer of these molds to gain as much detail - fingerprint detail - as possible.

I have several pounds of alginate on hand and would like to use it to contribute to this effort if it would be of value.

I am an new to homebrewing, extract so far, and have an open primary. What I am thinking is this:

I create a 500 ml starter, decant, then add sanitized water back to create a liquid volume needed to mix with the powdered alginate.

The aginate would be molded into a cone shape using a large funnel. I think a cone would allow good surface area for the exchange to take place.

This cone of encased yeast would be un molded once "set" and placed upside down on the bottom of the fermentor. The wort would of course be racked on top of it.

Monitoring fermentation character and progress as well as what is left behind would be done.

Thoughts?

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Old 07-09-2010, 07:52 PM   #57
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How are you going to secure the cone to the bottom of the primary, with it full of yeast?

Edit, nevermind, I see you said encased cone.

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Old 07-13-2010, 01:58 AM   #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpaceportBP View Post
I thought I would jump in here after reading the couple of entries about the use of alginate to encase the yeast. One of my other hobbies that at one point I took very seriously is "lifecasting." This involves creating very detailed sculptures from casts made directly off the human body (http://jean-paulart.com/lifecasting.htm). I use alginate in the first layer of these molds to gain as much detail - fingerprint detail - as possible.

I have several pounds of alginate on hand and would like to use it to contribute to this effort if it would be of value.

I am an new to homebrewing, extract so far, and have an open primary. What I am thinking is this:

I create a 500 ml starter, decant, then add sanitized water back to create a liquid volume needed to mix with the powdered alginate.

The aginate would be molded into a cone shape using a large funnel. I think a cone would allow good surface area for the exchange to take place.

This cone of encased yeast would be un molded once "set" and placed upside down on the bottom of the fermentor. The wort would of course be racked on top of it.

Monitoring fermentation character and progress as well as what is left behind would be done.

Thoughts?
You've got the right idea, but I think it's even easier than that. The commercial guys mix the yeast in the sodium alginate solution, then drip the alginate/yeast solution into a solution of calcium chloride to form little BB's. The yeast are then put into a tube (like a bazooka screen or similar) made of stainless steel (nylon window screen would probably work just as well). A simple dripper could be made from an inverted bottle with a hole in the cap, and a small hole in the bottle to relieve the vacuum.

Calcium chloride is a fairly common brewing salt, so it should be easy to find (and you don't need much).

http://www.eurovolvox.org/Protocols/...2.1_UK_eng.pdf
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