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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Beer Discussion > Wood in Beer (not Oak)
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Old 07-24-2012, 06:04 PM   #1
Stretch1991
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Default Wood in Beer (not Oak)

So I used to build and modify guitars and amplifiers when I was unemployed to suplement my income and now have bulk excess woods just chilling in my garage.

I have Snakewood, Purple Heart, Walnut, Cherry, Maple (both spalted and birdseye), ebony, rosewood, and several other.

I LOVE the smell of walnut going through a table saw, the smell of it charring reminds me of teasted marshmallows.

So what about adding these to my beer? I know oak is a very common wood to use for aging beer and I already have a 5 gallon whiskey barrel for my oak additions but what I want is something new and not commonly done.

Any ideas on how this will come out or anyone who has tried it already that can tell me what I can expect?

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Old 07-24-2012, 06:56 PM   #2
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You have to be careful with wood. I'm not an expert, but I know I've read that certain woods impart undesirable, if not harmful, elements into the beer. But, to answer from my own experience, I've used oak and spanish cedar. Spanish cedar is kind of cool. It adds citrus and clove type flavors.

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Old 07-24-2012, 07:01 PM   #3
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I actually have no idea how it will come out, but it sounds like exactly the perfect candidate for pulling out a gallon or half-gallon from a batch you like and adding some wood for a short secondary. You could even do a basic recipe you know oaks well, and then compare a bunch of different woods. That would be awesome.

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Old 07-24-2012, 07:02 PM   #4
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Very similar guidelines to smoking meat.

Generally, hardwoods are good, softwoods are bad (too resiny). If it bears something edible (fruit, nut) it's usually good (and often tasty).

From the top of my head, cherry and maple are for sure fine, and walnut probably. Not sure about the others, but a google search or meat smoking reference would help.

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Old 07-24-2012, 07:32 PM   #5
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Budweiser uses wood (I forget which kind) to increase the surface area to which the yeast can attach.

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Old 07-24-2012, 07:38 PM   #6
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They use beechwood which kind of gave me the idea last night. I was comparing my oak aged beer to a bud and was reading the can and thought "what about..." and I looked in my garage and saw endless possibilities

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Old 07-24-2012, 07:39 PM   #7
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Budweiser uses beechwood.

As a guitar player/amatuer tech, some of those woods are pricey, and I'd rather seem them go to a more lifelong purpose! You can get enough oak for a 5 gallon batch for a couple bucks at a LHBS. If you dont want the walnut or ebony, I know of a good home for them

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Old 07-24-2012, 07:39 PM   #8
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It is lagered with beechwood chips in the ageing vessel which, according to Anheuser-Busch, creates a smoother taste. While beechwood chips are used in the maturation tank, there is little to no flavor contribution from the wood, mainly because they are boiled in sodium bicarbonate [baking soda] for seven hours for the very purpose of removing any flavor from the wood. -wiki

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Old 07-24-2012, 08:00 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RainyDay View Post
Budweiser uses beechwood.

As a guitar player/amatuer tech, some of those woods are pricey, and I'd rather seem them go to a more lifelong purpose! You can get enough oak for a 5 gallon batch for a couple bucks at a LHBS. If you dont want the walnut or ebony, I know of a good home for them
I have alot of chips and chunks that are only good for highly detailed veneer work if I wanted to get fancy so I can drop them into some brews. I have bigger chunks I was going to cube up

I do however have some completeded hand made guitar bodies and necks for sale still. I sold a few of my put together guitars between 2-3k at my local music store so they are good quality things. Do you like strat or or tele bodies/necks? I have a nice ash burl veener tele body and a custum hendrix strat (painted with hendrix in a purple hazish setting, custom neck plate, and lefty headstock guitar but its a right handed guitar)

However back on track here it should be okay to add the wood I can assume
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Old 07-24-2012, 11:18 PM   #10
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I thought others had said walnut was dangerous to use. Might be wrong...

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