The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Beer Discussion > white labs

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 09-26-2007, 03:15 AM   #1
Dannyc31
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NY
Posts: 10
Default white labs

Is anyone else having a slow start time with white labs yeast, i used a California 5, which i had to kick start with a champane yeast. Now i have a pumpkin ale going on day three and it is like watching grass grow for the ferm to start. that was a english ale yeast from white labs also. seems they have some bad stuff out there or it is just taking forever to get going.

I am thinking of stopping to use there yeast for everything.

Dan

__________________
Dannyc31 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-26-2007, 03:17 AM   #2
Yuri_Rage
Gritty.
HBT_MODERATOR.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yuri_Rage's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Southwest
Posts: 13,893
Liked 598 Times on 370 Posts
Likes Given: 54

Default

Did you make a starter? If not, a 36+ hour lag time isn't unusual. 3 days seems excessive, though.

It's not bad yeast, it's bad procedures and bad advice. You should always make a starter with liquid yeast. "Pitchable" vials and smack packs really don't have the sort of viable cell count you need.

See www.mrmalty.com for a pretty thorough explanation and a calculator.

__________________
Homebrewed Blog..........YouTube Channel .......... Shirts, posters, etc
Yuri_Rage is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-26-2007, 03:25 AM   #3
Beerrific
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Beerrific's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Georgia
Posts: 5,600
Liked 44 Times on 37 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Might also look into your source of yeast as a possible problem. If it is not handled well between the lab and your home (example: hot weather and slow shipping) then the viability can suffer greatly.

FWIW, I have always had great success with their yeast.

__________________
Beerrific is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-26-2007, 03:27 AM   #4
paranode
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: DFW, TX
Posts: 433
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

I use it exclusively and only once made a starter. Lag time varies but it's always been going by the 36-hr mark for me.

__________________
paranode is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-26-2007, 03:29 AM   #5
Dannyc31
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NY
Posts: 10
Default

made starter every time, only have this problem with white labs

__________________
Dannyc31 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-26-2007, 03:34 AM   #6
sudbuster
This ain't my first rodeo....
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
sudbuster's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Western Arkansas
Posts: 4,049
Liked 267 Times on 210 Posts
Likes Given: 95

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuri_Rage
Did you make a starter? If not, a 36+ hour lag time isn't unusual. 3 days seems excessive, though.

It's not bad yeast, it's bad procedures and bad advice. You should always make a starter with liquid yeast. "Pitchable" vials and smack packs really don't have the sort of viable cell count you need.

See www.mrmalty.com for a pretty thorough explanation and a calculator.
I fully agree, please, don't take me wrong, i appreciate the yeast labs for making yeasts available to the homebrewer, but these pitifull little vials and packs are only a start to what is needed. I cut those things 6 ways and then boost a cut up to 3L in full kraeusen for lagers. Starters are VERY important....
__________________
sudbuster is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-26-2007, 02:10 PM   #7
TexLaw
Here's Lookin' Atcha!
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
TexLaw's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 3,695
Liked 24 Times on 23 Posts

Default

I've used California V a number of times. Even when I didn't use a starter, I got lag times far better than what OP describes. Make a starter, if you have time. No matter what, aeriate well, as that makes a huge difference in lag times. Pitch at proper temperatures.


TL

__________________
TexLaw is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-26-2007, 02:31 PM   #8
Buford
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Buford's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Richmond, VA
Posts: 1,415
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts

Default

I have also discovered that a stir plate makes a HUGE difference when making a starter. I get lag times of under 12 hours since I started using one.

__________________
Flying Dutchman Unlimited Ale Works
Buy my crap!


FERMENTING: ---
KEGGED/IN STORAGE: ---
KEGGED/ON TAP: ---

DIY STUFF: Sanyo 4912 kegerator conversion
Buford is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-26-2007, 04:19 PM   #9
Austinhomebrew
Vendor
HBT_SPONSOR.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Austinhomebrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 3,484
Liked 107 Times on 87 Posts
Likes Given: 90

Default

Whenever yeast is at warmer temperatures for a length of time, like when being shipped for several days, it will increase the lag time. If your batch doesn't start within 24 hours after pitching, a vigorous stir will help a lot. You can also add Yeast Fuel or another type of yeast nutrient to ensure a healthy fermentation. It is also very wise to have a couple packets of Nottingham dry yeast on hand for emergencies. Dry yeast will last several years and it never has a problem starting.

I am willing to give out free samples of our Yeast Fuel (1 per customer or address) simply email info@austinhomebrew.com and mention "Homebrewtalk"
Yeast fuel is a yeast nutrient that is very beneficial to the yeast when fermenting. Our customers have told us that it produces a very clean and fast fermentation. It can take as much as 48 hours off of your fermentation time.

__________________

Last edited by Austinhomebrew; 09-26-2007 at 04:23 PM.
Austinhomebrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-03-2007, 02:59 AM   #10
thurvin
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16
Default Starter are *not* necessary for anything except Big Beer.

Don't believe the hype. Unless you're brewer something like a imperial stout barley wine or other big beers, in my experience, you don't need a start with White Labs. It is just a extra step, and another place one can screw up. If it gets a bug in starter, the bug mutliples too. Also, no way, a quart or any thing less than a gallon starter will give you anything close to the cell count to matter.

Try simple aeroation, like shaking the fermentor for 5-10 minutes. Oxygen will allow the yeast to reproduce to required cell count.
Most of the time, I get a lag time of 12-18 hours with white lab. Pitch temp is probably more importart than a starter. (about 80 degree for ales 50 for lagers) If you are using a Ale pail type , check the seal on the container. I have had it happen that I didn't seal it correctly and the bugger didn't bubble until I close right.

__________________
thurvin is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
White Labs 002 = US-04? Benny Blanco Recipes/Ingredients 7 09-12-2011 05:00 AM
White Labs 833 Aspera General Techniques 2 02-19-2009 01:57 PM
white labs delweaver Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 7 04-21-2008 05:36 PM
White Labs shbrewer General Beer Discussion 12 03-07-2007 01:40 PM