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Old 12-18-2012, 12:57 PM   #761
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Are you sure you didn't make the same beer twice? Those look pretty much identical to me. Do they taste the same?
No, the definitely taste different. The ale is sweeter, thicker and more bitter. The worts did taste similar though.
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Old 12-18-2012, 02:42 PM   #762
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The ale is sweeter, thicker and more bitter.
well that doesn't make a whole lot of sense to me... the porter should have been thicker and more bitter, IMO.
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Old 12-18-2012, 03:13 PM   #763
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well that doesn't make a whole lot of sense to me... the porter should have been thicker and more bitter, IMO.
I think the honey in the ale made it feel thicker to me (thicker might not even be the right descriptor).

And as I said, I also bumped up the hops in the ale and did a full boil on that (boil 6 gal for 5 gal batch) and did a partial for the porter (boil 7 gal for 10 gal batch). So the IBU calculators are saying the ale will be more bitter.
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Old 12-19-2012, 01:33 AM   #764
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I think the honey in the ale made it feel thicker to me (thicker might not even be the right descriptor).

And as I said, I also bumped up the hops in the ale and did a full boil on that (boil 6 gal for 5 gal batch) and did a partial for the porter (boil 7 gal for 10 gal batch). So the IBU calculators are saying the ale will be more bitter.
The photo is puzzling - your honey ale, which is like an English Pale Ale with honey, should be significantly lighter than your porter. I didn't follow what you were saying about your brew day.

Also, honey ferments out fully, makes your beer drier, and usually a 'thicker' mouthfeel is associated with a higher final gravity, not a lower one.
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Old 12-27-2012, 01:49 AM   #765
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So i read like 30 something pages and did not see what I was looking for other than some debate as to whether or not to add the honey at start of boil. I just bought the northern brewer version of the porter and it suggest adding the whole pound of honey at start of boil. Does everyone think this will be OK? I want a hint of honey but not overpowering and not unnoticeable. Anyone got any suggestions? Is this decided on any particular page?

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Old 12-27-2012, 02:13 AM   #766
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So i read like 30 something pages and did not see what I was looking for other than some debate as to whether or not to add the honey at start of boil. I just bought the northern brewer version of the porter and it suggest adding the whole pound of honey at start of boil. Does everyone think this will be OK? I want a hint of honey but not overpowering and not unnoticeable. Anyone got any suggestions? Is this decided on any particular page?
Common knowledge says boiling honey kills flavor and aroma. Some stuff I've read has disagreed and says while it alters and subdues, it doesn't entirely eliminate (but this is also in the context of mead). So if you boil it the whole time, you're basically just adding expensive sugar. Either add it at the VERY end of the boil, at flameout, or after it's already chilled. I add mine after flameout, generally when it's at about 180-190, just for pasteurization purposes.
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Old 12-27-2012, 02:28 AM   #767
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Common knowledge says boiling honey kills flavor and aroma. Some stuff I've read has disagreed and says while it alters and subdues, it doesn't entirely eliminate (but this is also in the context of mead). So if you boil it the whole time, you're basically just adding expensive sugar. Either add it at the VERY end of the boil, at flameout, or after it's already chilled. I add mine after flameout, generally when it's at about 180-190, just for pasteurization purposes.
I would recommend adding it at none of those times. The CO2 produced during fermentation can also scrub out much of the delicate flavor and aroma, so after the primary fermentation is already done is definitely the best time. The relatively aseptic nature of honey and the yeast and alcohol that's already present in the beer seem to take care of any potential infections.

With mead, you don't have the benefit of alcohol and a ton of yeast already being present, so if you're still concerned about bacteria and wild yeast, you can just do what we do for mead and add some campden to inhibit them. Honey is amazingly flavorful but delicate stuff, and it's such a shame to lose some of its character doing things you don't have to.
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Old 12-27-2012, 02:39 AM   #768
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Either add it at the VERY end of the boil, at flameout, or after it's already chilled. I add mine after flameout, generally when it's at about 180-190, just for pasteurization purposes.
I added it at flame out... You can absolutely identify the presence of honey in the beer, both in taste and aroma. Regarding the taste, it is NOT like honey malt - it is not sweet. My bet is that a longer boil would reduce its presence in the finished product.
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Old 12-27-2012, 11:00 AM   #769
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I too, added honey at flame out and I can say that the honey is noticeable in my beer. It is still subtle and if you didn't know it was there, you might miss it. Once you know it's there there's no denying it.
The beer is sweet -blame this on Windsor ... A notorious poor attenuator. The honey flavor is deceptively boosted by the combination of this sweetness and the Toasted Buiscuity flavor of the Amber malt.

I think it's a very good honey ale. It has enough without being blow-your-head-off or fake.

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Old 12-27-2012, 11:31 AM   #770
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I made the Honey Ale back in September and it has really gotten good over the last couple weeks. At first I didn't like it very much, but it has gotten really smooth and tasty as time goes on. I added the honey at flameout and it's there, but not overpowering. Definitely not a sweet beer, and I'm pretty happy with it.

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