The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Beer Discussion > What is your hop schedule philosophy?

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 12-17-2012, 04:59 PM   #11
bobbrews
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Sierra, Nevada
Posts: 3,513
Liked 276 Times on 238 Posts
Likes Given: 18

Default

To those who call 20-10 min. (or more loosely 25-5 min.) "The Flavor" addition, does that mean if you avoid adding hops at these times, that your beer will have little to no hop flavor?

__________________
bobbrews is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-17-2012, 05:09 PM   #12
nukebrewer
Brew the brew!
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 10 reviews
 
nukebrewer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Groton, CT
Posts: 4,672
Liked 2521 Times on 1478 Posts
Likes Given: 5683

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobbrews View Post
To those who call 20-10 min. (or more loosely 25-5 min.) "The Flavor" addition, does that mean if you avoid adding hops at these times, that your beer will have little to no hop flavor?
It my understanding that calling it a "flavor" addition just means that it will only contribute flavor and little bitterness because the aroma compounds will be boiled off. Aroma additions (later than 10-15 minutes) will still contribute flavor.
__________________

The only thing more asinine than stupid rules is the enforcement of rules simply because they are the rules.

Inhopsicated: A Beer Blog

Inhopsicated on Twitter

nukebrewer is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-17-2012, 05:15 PM   #13
logan3825
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Posts: 1,027
Liked 45 Times on 34 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

I usually go with a hop schedule of
60m
15m
5m
2m
dry hop one week
I feel hops between 60m and 20m are kind of a waste if you are doing a 60m boil.

Sometimes the hops are alternated in the last additions and sometimes they are half and half,(
Amarillo
Simcoe
Amarillo
or
Amarillo/Simcoe
Amarillo/Simcoe
Amarillo/Simcoe

__________________
logan3825 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-17-2012, 05:17 PM   #14
bobbrews
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Sierra, Nevada
Posts: 3,513
Liked 276 Times on 238 Posts
Likes Given: 18

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nukebrewer View Post
It my understanding that calling it a "flavor" addition just means that it will only contribute flavor and little bitterness because the aroma compounds will be boiled off. Aroma additions (later than 10-15 minutes) will still contribute flavor.
I know what it is intended to describe. I've seen all of those nicely categorized graphs that try to break it down for you so easily in a simple order that you can understand. But it doesn't work that way.

Flavor and aroma are synonymous when you're discussing hop character. I like to reword it like Einstein's Spacetime, or in this case Flavoraroma. You can't taste if you don't smell. And the best aroma is had with very very late boil and dryhop additions. You can still sense the flavoraroma imparted by the hops at 15 minutes left in the boil, but it won't be as strong as it will at 5 or 0 minutes... you'll just more bitterness from the extra 10-15 minutes of boiling at the expense of less flavoraroma.

If you're discussing hop bitterness however, well then that's usually about a very general no frills kind of bitter flavor, and not orangey- grapefruity-piney flavors and aromas per se.

"Flavor" does not peak at 15/10 minutes left in the boil. Rather, the later you add your hops, the more flavoraroma you will get from them. Dryhopping gives you tons of hop flavor. Add a bunch of Citra dryhop to an otherwise very piney base recipe, and you'll have a pineapple, mango, lychee bomb of a beer on your hands.

3/4 oz @ 60
2 oz. @ 10
3 oz @ warm aroma steep
3 oz. @ dryhop

...will be more flavorful and aromatic in terms of hop character than...

1.5 oz. @ 60
1.5 oz. @ 20
1.5 oz. @ 15
1 oz. @ 10
1 oz. @ 5
1 oz. @ flameout
2 oz. @ dryhop
__________________
bobbrews is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-17-2012, 06:38 PM   #15
Calichusetts
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Calichusetts's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Plymouth, MA
Posts: 2,312
Liked 221 Times on 162 Posts
Likes Given: 592

Default

Only late hop additions...I get to use more hops this way. I haven't had an addition outside of 30 minutes for a while now and I really like the results.

__________________
Calichusetts is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-17-2012, 07:04 PM   #16
nukebrewer
Brew the brew!
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 10 reviews
 
nukebrewer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Groton, CT
Posts: 4,672
Liked 2521 Times on 1478 Posts
Likes Given: 5683

Default

I forgot to say what mine was. With a few exceptions (experimenting with FWH) my schedule for hop forward beers has been a small high alpha charge at 60 and something along the lines of 1 oz each at 15-10-5-0 followed by dry hopping with anywhere from 1-3 oz for 7-10 days. Today for the first time I am doing pure hop bursting for the boil hops. 2 oz at 15 then 1 oz each a 10-5-0. It will also be dry hopped with 2 oz for 7-10 days. In this case it's a high alpha hop so I don't need to deviate from my normal schedule too much except, of course, for the not having a bittering addition.

__________________

The only thing more asinine than stupid rules is the enforcement of rules simply because they are the rules.

Inhopsicated: A Beer Blog

Inhopsicated on Twitter

nukebrewer is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-17-2012, 07:31 PM   #17
treehousebrewing
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 75
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts

Default

I've just started messing around with FWH, but my schedule is generally a smaller dose of high alpha at boil or FWH for about 50% of my IBU load, then a much larger charge at 10 minutes, then an equal charge at flameout with a steeping period. The exact quantities depend on the heft of beer I'm making. Then, 2-4 oz for dry hop. I recently made jake keeler's BIAB CDA recipe wherein he blended 3 hop varieties equally and used that blend for each addition. It created a really complex layered hop profile and I thought it was really inspiring, so I've been experimenting with that more.

__________________
treehousebrewing is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-17-2012, 07:38 PM   #18
logan3825
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Posts: 1,027
Liked 45 Times on 34 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

I just did a Cascade American wheat with
2oz 15m
2oz 10m
2oz 5m
2oz flameout
let sit 45m before starting cooling.

If it turns out I think I will do more hop bursting in the future since I like hop flavor but am not really a fan of the high IBU beers.

__________________
logan3825 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-18-2012, 12:21 AM   #19
Horseballs
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Shaker Heights, Ohio
Posts: 152
Liked 20 Times on 19 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

For a "standard" not that hoppy beer I either just do a bittering addition or a 60-15-5 addition that isn't too over the top. For hoppy beers I like to do a 60-15-5-0 schedule, but really piling on the flameout hops. Something like a DIPA I add in a 30 minute addition to round it out. I tend to use 8 oz of hops in an IPA, with at least 7 of those ounces in the last fifteen minutes. Dry hops are anywhere between 1 and 5 oz.

__________________
Horseballs is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-18-2012, 12:43 AM   #20
Toecutter
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Toecutter's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Riverside, ca
Posts: 592
Liked 10 Times on 6 Posts

Default

I dont like my beer too bitter, so I start my additions at 30 min. I accidently bought some Calypso and found it to be a superb bittering hop, smooth and not too harsh. I use a Hopback and add some hot wort to start breaking down the pellets that I place in a hop bag inside the hop back. after my whirlpool, the last pass goes thru the Hop back and into the fermenter. When i keg , i put an ounce, usually cascade, centennial, or amarillo into a new nylon stocking and and let it drop to the bottom of the keg. There it sits until the keg is done.

__________________
When a naked man is chasing a naked woman through an alley with a butcher knife and a hard-on, I figure he isn't out collecting for the Red Cross." - Dirty Harry

On Tap: Belgian Orange Crystalweizen, Toecutters Honey HPA

Fermenting: Belgian Orange Crystalweizen
Toecutter is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Armchair Philosophy Re: Hop Utilization TAK General Beer Discussion 7 07-15-2012 09:29 PM
my new philosophy with kegging equipment gnef Bottling/Kegging 21 01-17-2012 03:02 AM
drunken philosophy voodoobrew General Beer Discussion 7 01-20-2011 06:27 PM
Recipe Philosophy benxrow2002 Recipes/Ingredients 18 02-01-2008 11:06 AM