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Old 12-06-2012, 07:51 PM   #31
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Why don't you scale your batches up and do 5.5? I do 10.5 for most standard batches and 11 gallons for big IPA's with a lot of dry hopping. This way I ensure I end up with two full 5 gallon kegs.

$0.72 for an AG pale ale? You must be including equipment depreciation expenses.
Just the things I said, and of course, propane. I'm being realistic about product losses too. I brew a 5.5G batch by the time I factor in equipment, kettle, fermenter and sample losses, and that first pint in the keg that's mostly yeast... I end up with about 4.5G to drink. Dryhops absorb beer too, and I DO factor that in.

I just checked my numbers. That number is about right. Some will say that I'm counting too much for losses, but I find kegging increases losses somewhat, and I try to be realistic about the number of pints I actually pull from a batch.

I'm 175 gallons into my brew career, and I have to say, I'm being very honest about my results. I'd love to engage in the one upmanship that is: I can make beer cheaper then you, but I can't compete.

As an addendum, I tend to brew with leaf hops which also accounts for way more in losses then pellets do.
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Old 12-06-2012, 08:41 PM   #32
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$1.02/500ml.
I don't drink enough to justify "cost saving" larger inventory with shelf-life issues and with the storage space and storage equipment.
I don't drink enough to reduce the variety I get with 5 gallons mini-mash batches. I've thought about, but haven't moved toward smaller batches.
And I still love and buy commercial beer.

That said, $1.02/500ml ain't bad.

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Old 12-06-2012, 08:50 PM   #33
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"over the long haul" is the key there and that's only if you're able to leave well enough alone. Many brewers develop a toy fetish and there's no way you're going to hit the magic break even point if you keep buying conicals and building cold rooms. I would never be so silly as to do the math. It would only depress me and I'm just fine not knowing my true cost per pint. It's really easy to do if you just consider single batch costs but go ahead and do some real accounting (including losses like dumping a whole keg into the kegerator due to a leaky seal or your kid opening the tap and walking away or just making a crappy batch).

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Old 12-06-2012, 08:57 PM   #34
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I would never be so silly as to do the math. It would only depress me and I'm just fine not knowing my true cost per pint. It's really easy to do if you just consider single batch costs but go ahead and do some real accounting (including losses like dumping a whole keg into the kegerator due to a leaky seal or your kid opening the tap and walking away or just making a crappy batch).

I think it would really be quite difficult to determine an accurate cost per pint. I mean, are folks including the electricity cost to run their keezer, electricity to freeze/store your hops and yeast, the buttloads of water just washing and rinsing things in between brew days, gas/electricity heating up yeast starter worts and subsequent chilling, etc etc. There are so many miscellaneous costs...I don't think I really WANT to know what my pint costs either.
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Old 12-06-2012, 09:05 PM   #35
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wow, homebrewing is expensive in the US.
discounting electricity costs, i can brew a mild at about 12p a pint, or somethig hoppy about 18p. a double ipa costs me 32p per pint. (uk pint &568ml) i wash yeast but dry sachets cost £2 each for premium yeasts.

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Old 12-06-2012, 09:30 PM   #36
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I think it would really be quite difficult to determine an accurate cost per pint. I mean, are folks including the electricity cost to run their keezer, electricity to freeze/store your hops and yeast, the buttloads of water just washing and rinsing things in between brew days, gas/electricity heating up yeast starter worts and subsequent chilling, etc etc. There are so many miscellaneous costs...I don't think I really WANT to know what my pint costs either.
Well if we are going to get that in depth on the cost analysis, what about the cost of fuel and vehicle maintenance you are saving by NOT driving to the store every time you need beer? I'm sure that alone offsets the cost of propane to brew and electricity to keep your stuff cold.

I brew because I enjoy it but I know I'm also saving money.
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Old 12-06-2012, 09:39 PM   #37
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I typically go to the fridge when I need a beer, not all the way to the beer store. I drink way more commercial beer since I became a brewer so I go to the store more often. Then there are the times I run to the nearest homebrew shop because I forgot a specific kind of yeast. Making the argument that you drive less distance since you started homebrewing is likely to have many flaws.

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Old 12-06-2012, 09:47 PM   #38
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I have a spreadsheet I used to use that tracked every cost and consumable used for brewing. Utilities, ingredients, foil, gasoline, starter wort, mason jar lids, everything. I even errored on the side of caution and threw in a few extra bucks for stuff I may have forgotten. And even then I was pumping out 5 gallon batches for 14-18 dollars. Of course, homegrown hops and stretching out yeast make a huge difference. Now that is independent of my equipment costs though. I compare my equpiment costs to what I'm saving vs buying beer and when I hit the break even point I'll consider my equipment free.

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Old 12-06-2012, 09:59 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobby_M View Post
I typically go to the fridge when I need a beer, not all the way to the beer store. I drink way more commercial beer since I became a brewer so I go to the store more often. Then there are the times I run to the nearest homebrew shop because I forgot a specific kind of yeast. Making the argument that you drive less distance since you started homebrewing is likely to have many flaws.
See this is where we differ. I got into homebrewing because I love good beer but can't afford to buy craft beer every week. I drink MUCH less craft beer now that I homebrew. I used to buy about 12 bottles of craft every week, no that I brew I buy beer about once every 3-4 months...only if my pipeline is running low.
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Old 12-06-2012, 10:10 PM   #40
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According to excel, it costs me $0.37 a bottle to make. Now that I got cheaper bulk grain it will drop even more.



Now I don't calculate equipment in bottle cost. But I do calculate equipment. I have spent $460 on everything (from stoppers to the freezer). Mash tun and freezer were half of that cost. I won't be upgrading any time soon. Maybe in 10 years.

Edit: oh and i do buy commercial beer. About a 6 every two weeks, of something under 12$.

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