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Old 10-19-2006, 02:56 PM   #1
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Default What makes a "tripel" a tripel?

I'm under the impression that a tripel has three fermentations. One initial, another addition of yeast in the middle, then a thrid addition of yeast when you bottle. is this correct, or am I delusional?

My tripel stopped fermenting at around 1.055. I added some more yeast and its chugging away again. Once it reaches its FG, should I pitch healthy yeast, prime and bottle?

thanks

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Old 10-19-2006, 03:37 PM   #2
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"Tripel" refers to the amount of malt used. A dubbel being double the amount in a basic trappist, tripel being triple the amount, quadrupel being quadruple the amount. It's got nothing to do with how many times you pitch the yeast.

I wouldn't pitch at bottling...you might spark some bottle bombs, and you run the risk of your beer having a distinctly yeasty taste/smell.

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Old 10-19-2006, 05:19 PM   #3
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If pitching at bottling time causes bottle bombs it wasn't time to bottle.

Usually re-pitching at bottling is only needed for lagers which have sat a really long time and had alot of the yeast floc out.

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Old 10-20-2006, 12:40 AM   #4
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I know pitching fresh yeast at bottling time is done at Chimay, but they filter all the fermentation yeast out beforehand. If I remember right repitching is also done in some hefeweizens.

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Old 10-20-2006, 06:28 AM   #5
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This is the second time in a day someone said that repitching at bottling time causes bottle bombs. Not true. Bottle bombs are caused by bottling too early or adding too much sugar. The amount of yeast present will only change the amount of time before the bottle bursts if it's going to.

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Old 10-20-2006, 03:20 PM   #6
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Dang, yo, 'twas just a theory. I think I laid out my logic for it on another thread. It's never actually happened to me, most importantly because I've never repitched at bottling. Thanks for correcting my theory---but there's no need to pile on.

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Old 04-30-2011, 08:56 PM   #7
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Getting back to the original question, what are the OG threshholds for the belgian styles. From looking in the recipe database, it seems like there isn't a big difference between the dubbels and triples.

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Old 04-30-2011, 09:05 PM   #8
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I've also seen commercial dubbels and tripels that seem to have very close ABV, so I think their style ranges can come close to overlapping. Many dubbels I've seen are darker so probably use some crystal and roasted malts. While most tripels I've noticed are paler in color. Try looking in the wiki for the actual style guidelines. If you want to know about the OG and ABV potential of Belgians in general, it can get pretty high. 12-13% range is possible. Some people might have experience with even higher ABV from Belgian yeasts.

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Old 04-30-2011, 09:08 PM   #9
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This may well be the most extreme thread resurrection I've seen in a long time. 4.5 years. Good job, all.

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Old 04-24-2012, 12:49 AM   #10
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To revive this thread yet again, I have a recipe for barley wine that I am following and it says to pitch fresh yeast at bottling. The guy at the local brewing supply store didn't think it would be necessary. The final ABV should be around 9.5-10% and I am aging it in the secondary for at least a few weeks right now after about 2 weeks of primary fermentation. I have read elsewhere that the yeast gets fairly "beat up" in higher alcohol beers so there may not be enough left to get the job done when it comes to carbonating the beer in bottles. But, 10% isn't terribly high compared to some beers. Thoughts anyone? I've copied my recipe below if you're interested:


5 gallons, grain and extract; OG = 1.092; FG = 1.020-1.024

Ingredients:
7 lbs. domestic two-row malt
1 lb cara-pils malt
6.5 lbs. light liquid malt extract
1 lb. Colver honey
1 oz. Perle hops (10% alpha acid) for 60 min.
1.3 oz Mount Hood hops (7.5% alpha acid): 0.8 oz. for 30 min. and 0.5 oz for 15 min.
1 oz Crystal hops at end of boil
San Diego Super Yeast WLP090
½ cup priming sugar

Hops:
60 min. 1 oz. Perle hops
30 min. 0.8 oz. Mount Hood hops
15 min. 0.5 oz. Mount Hood hops

Steps:
• Mash grains into 2.5 gal. of water and hold for a 60 min. conversion at 152 F.
• Sparge with 168 F water collecting 5 gal. of runoff.
• Bring to boil while dissolving malt extract and honey; total boil is 90 min.
• After 30 min. add 1oz. Perle hops; boil 30 more minutes.
• After 30 min. add 0.8 oz. Mount Hood hops; boil 15 more minutes.
• After 15 min. add 0.5 oz. Mount Hood hops; boil 15 more minutes.
• Turn off heat and add 1 oz. Crystal hops.
• Cool and aerate.
• Pitch yeast at 70 F.
• Ferment at 58 – 70 F.
• Age for 1-2 months.
• Use corn sugar and fresh yeast for bottling.

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