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Old 12-05-2008, 05:31 PM   #1
Raffie
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Default what makes a stout milky and smooth?

Looking around see lots of things I can use but not a real common one.

Maybe I have not looked hard enough but thought I'd ask it here since there is lots of knowledge in the forums.

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Old 12-05-2008, 05:34 PM   #2
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It's lactose....

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Old 12-05-2008, 05:38 PM   #3
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Could be a variety of things- use of Carapils/Dextrin malt, flaked oats, higher mash temps that favor long chain dextrins, maltodextrine, etc.

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Old 12-05-2008, 05:41 PM   #4
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Allow me to expand on Rev's short answer. If it's a 'milk' stout or a 'sweet' stout, then the brewer probably added lactose, which is milk sugar and is not fermentable by saccharomyces cerivisae. However, the broader answer is, long-chain dextrins in their many forms (beer yeast can't eat sugars with longer, complex chains). They can be achieved by mashing at higher temps (155-158f), it can be achieved by adding maltodextrin powder to the boil (which gives it a creamy, smooth, thick body without the lactose sweetness), you can add lactose powder, which gives it more of a sweetness, you can add oats (as in Oatmeal Stout) to the mash, and/or dextrin malt like carapils. Just depends on what you're going for. You should try a commercial example of a milk/sweet stout, though, to see if you like the style before you go by Revvy's answer and just start dumping lactose in your stout. Might be that you're not necessarily looking for a milk stout, and you might instead just need to add a bunch of maltodextrin powder to the boil.

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Old 12-05-2008, 07:13 PM   #5
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Everything said in this thread is very valid, but one very important point has been overlooked: carbonation. If you carb a sweet/oatmeal stout over 2 volumes of CO2 it will begin to seem dry and crisp. If you follow everything that was said here and carb to about 1.5-2 volumes of CO2 you will get a nice creamy and heavy mouth feel.

I recently split a ten gallon batch of oatmeal stout with one of my local homebrew buddies. He took his keg and carbed it at the same volumes that he carbs all his american ales and what have you. He then told me how disappointed he was with the lack of creaminess in the beer. I was confused because we mashed pretty high and used 10% oats, but I hadn't cracked mine yet so I wasn't sure. Well I carbed mine to two volumes and it is fantastic, nice mouth coating viscosity and rich creamy texture thanks to proper carbonation.

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Old 12-05-2008, 08:05 PM   #6
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Are you talking homebrew/micro bottled stout, or stout served on tap. If its the first, then everything above is valid. If its on tap, the carbonation is proably the main difference. Stouts are served on a percentage of nitrogen gas. This creates smaller bubbles and makes the beer silky smooth. The other factors help too.

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Old 12-09-2008, 03:11 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tonedef131 View Post
Everything said in this thread is very valid, but one very important point has been overlooked: carbonation. If you carb a sweet/oatmeal stout over 2 volumes of CO2 it will begin to seem dry and crisp. If you follow everything that was said here and carb to about 1.5-2 volumes of CO2 you will get a nice creamy and heavy mouth feel.

I recently split a ten gallon batch of oatmeal stout with one of my local homebrew buddies. He took his keg and carbed it at the same volumes that he carbs all his american ales and what have you. He then told me how disappointed he was with the lack of creaminess in the beer. I was confused because we mashed pretty high and used 10% oats, but I hadn't cracked mine yet so I wasn't sure. Well I carbed mine to two volumes and it is fantastic, nice mouth coating viscosity and rich creamy texture thanks to proper carbonation.
How do you determine CO2 volume?
When I keg I usually hit my keg with 20psi while it ages, then when I tap I keep it at 9psi.
Am I doing it wrong?
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Old 12-09-2008, 03:59 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raffie View Post
How do you determine CO2 volume?
When I keg I usually hit my keg with 20psi while it ages, then when I tap I keep it at 9psi.
Am I doing it wrong?
You can use a chart such as appears at the bottom of this page

Draft Beer Disp.

to find a combination of temperature and equilibrium pressure that will result in desired carbonation in volumes of dissolved c02.
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Old 12-09-2008, 04:10 PM   #9
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in addition to the above Force Carbonation & Carb Table

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Old 12-09-2008, 04:38 PM   #10
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Hey Evan! I've always wanted to add malto-dextrin to the boil, but I've never known a good ratio, and I've heard horror stories about adding malto, and creating a beer jello. I know it will vary on the recipe, but what do you think a good ball park range would be for a basic stout recipe...I was thinking somewhere around 4-6 ounces

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