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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Beer Discussion > Way too much head.
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Old 04-19-2013, 10:18 PM   #1
Rhcamp01
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Default Way too much head.

I have a keezer with two kegs filled. I forced carbed both and they sat for a few days but they will not poor without extreme foam. I have purged swapped lines and ran gas into the brew and then purged, ran off, etc... Any tips would be appreciated. This was the first time I pulled a 12 pack from the beer prior to kegging and I am wondering if the amount of liquid removed has anything to do with it.

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Old 04-19-2013, 10:20 PM   #2
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what is your regulator set at? how long is the line? what is the inside diameter of the line?

do a search for kegerator equilibrium

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Old 04-19-2013, 11:00 PM   #3
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^this. Had a friend with similar problem. Turns out, his line was way too short.

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Old 04-19-2013, 11:58 PM   #4
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Lines are around 6foot and your standard diameter. Regulator was on 9psi. Turned it down to 5 and it has helped, but still foaming

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Old 04-20-2013, 12:27 AM   #5
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For that short of line, you will need the smaller diameter line to reduce foaming

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Old 04-20-2013, 12:33 AM   #6
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I'm having the same problem. Approx. 6 ft. lines, 3/16 ID, set at 10 PSI. After a bunch of research on this forum (and a few others, truth be told), I went out and bought 10 ft 3/16 ID lines. I'm installing those this weekend, and that will hopefully fix the problem. It seems to be the fix for a lot of others in this same boat.

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Old 04-24-2013, 01:47 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boortzie
I'm having the same problem. Approx. 6 ft. lines, 3/16 ID, set at 10 PSI. After a bunch of research on this forum (and a few others, truth be told), I went out and bought 10 ft 3/16 ID lines. I'm installing those this weekend, and that will hopefully fix the problem. It seems to be the fix for a lot of others in this same boat.
Let me know if it works. I have had three kegs work just fine. These two new ones are crazy though.
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Old 04-24-2013, 02:59 AM   #8
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I had the same problem. Started a thread about it. Titled "foamy but flat, what gives?" I think.

I tried force (burst) carbing... once. I overcarbed my beer. Was pretty foamy till the end. Every keg after that has been set it to serving pressure, and let it sit for approx a week. (However, will be tapping one that's been on gas about 5 days tonight)

General consensus is 10ft lines minimum. Check the carbonation chart on kegerators.com to see what psi you need to be at, according to your beer temp and desired vols. This should be your serving pressure. Then you can use a line length calculator to determine approx how long your lines need to be.

Easy way though, and what works for me, is 34-36 farenheight, 10 foot lines, and 14psi (I like them carbed a bit high, though). First pint pours about 1/2 to 2/3 foam, because the tap itself is warm. After I toss (err-drink) that foamy mess, every subsequent pint of the night is perfect with about a 1" head. And I can visually see the tap sorta frost/fog up, so I know it (and the lines) are cold enough to not force co2 outta solution.

YMMV

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Old 04-24-2013, 05:37 AM   #9
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There is a lot to balancing a keg.
If you're serving cold (somewhere around 34 to 38 F) you'll want to carb a little lower... say 10 psi.
Use 3/16" lines, and use the length to adjust the rate of pour. 10' is about right for 12 psi, but may be too long for 10 psi, and the beer may pour slow.

Start with the temp you like to serve at, and then use a chart to figure out how much pressure to use relative to how much carbonated you like your beer.
Set the pressure to what you like, chill the beer, and let it carbonate for a week.
Then use the line length to adjust the flow rate.

Oh, and when you pour, snap the tap open. Feathering the tap makes foamy beer.

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Old 05-02-2013, 04:07 PM   #10
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Thanks to all that have replied. After a few weeks, a new question has come to mind. My tap line does not have beer in the tube. Once I open the tap it then fills and foams the first runoff. I poor a second right after and it is perfect but there is also beer in the line. My other tap has beer in the line and it is poring just fine now.

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