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Old 10-30-2009, 05:37 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by johntangus View Post
Is there a reason that you are washing dry yeast.?Why not just spend $1.75 on another packet?
I'll let Biermmuncher (who has been in BYO, btw) answer that for you, since he harvests it.

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Originally Posted by BierMuncher View Post
I use '05 all the time and pitching a fresh packet can give you 24-36 hour lag times.

Harvest up that huge yeast cake after this batch and you'll have fermentation within 10 hours on your next one.

He does it will all his yeast and explains why.

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I harvest full notty yeast cakes and split them in half and it's plenty to get a full "boil" going within a few hours.

If it were my brewshop?

I'd sanitize an apple juice jar and pour in half the slurry from the fermenter for a near future brew.

I'd then leave the remaining yeast cake in the primary and follow your plan.

I don't do it to save the $2.00, but to get a good full fermentation more quickly. Plus...it simply goes against my nature to throw away a beautiful bounty of vibrant yeast.
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Plus...you know how much friggin yeast you can harvest? It's like magic. Pour in one little bitty packet of dry powder...a few days later, you collect a half-quart of beautiful yeast pudding.

I get 05 for under 2 bucks as well so I don't save mine though, but often I do pitch on top of the cake, so I am recycling it. But I think I do have some windsor in my fridge or us-04 since it's not something I use a lot of.

BUT remember, after you harvest the yeast, it is no longer a dry yeast, it is a liquid, and should be treated as any other, including down the line when you are using it, making a starter.
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Old 10-30-2009, 05:43 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by johntangus View Post
Is there a reason that you are washing dry yeast.?Why not just spend $1.75 on another packet?
Maybe because his priorities are different to yours?

Could be an extra saving. I do a ten gallon batch for about $18.... $3.50 on yeast would be a significant percentage of that. I don't do cheap to be cheap, but I will do it for fun.

Or maybe it's an excercise in crafstmanship and getting to know the processes?

Who knows what reasons people have for what they do? It was just a simple question that he asked.
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Old 10-30-2009, 05:43 PM   #13
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Sorry, it's been awhile since i've bought S-05, I guess it's gone up.

I was under the impression that folks wash and reuse more liquid strains than dry because of price/quality. Not saying the S-05 isn't a robust dry yeast - just dry in general.

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Old 10-30-2009, 05:55 PM   #14
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Sorry, it's been awhile since i've bought S-05, I guess it's gone up.

I was under the impression that folks wash and reuse more liquid strains than dry because of price/quality. Not saying the S-05 isn't a robust dry yeast - just dry in general.
That idea about dry as opposed to liquid, or that one is better than the other is based on word of mouth that comes from anti-dry yeast propaganda that evolved from the bad old days before 1978 and legal homebrewing, when the only yeast that was available came from Europe in dry cakes that may have sat in the hot cargo hold of a ship for months, then sat under the lid of a can a blue ribbon malt extract for god knows how long.

I do believe that in the 21st century a company is able to measure out grams of dry ingredients pretty accurately. And millions of dollars both from the hobby and professional brewing industry would be at stake if they couldn't turn out a consistent product.

Good quality dry yeast has been used by commercial breweries for decades if not longer, and it was only since Homebrewing was legalized was the stuff we know available to homebrewers.

That's why every dry yeast house has industrial divisions.

Danstars website even alludes to this...

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The use of active dried professional yeasts for amateur brewing is a relatively new phenomenon introduced by Lallemand. Now, choose your active dried yeast for brewing with confidence. Ask for Danstar superior quality yeasts at your local retailer.
So most of those notions you have really are just biased carryovers from the bad old days.

I use dry yeast for 99% of my beers, for basic ales I use safale 05, for more british styles I us safale 04 and for basic lagers I use saflager..

The only time I use liquid yeast is if I am making a beer where the yeast drives the style, where certain flavor characteristics are derived from the yeast, such as phenols. Like Belgian beers, where you get spicy/peppery flavors from the yeast and higher temp fermentation. Or let's say a wheat beer (needing a lowly flocculant yest) or a Kholsch, where the style of the beer uses a specific yeast strain that is un available in dry form.

I have found that a lot of new brewers especially, THINK they HAVE to use liquid yeast, but in reality most ales can be made with Notty, Windsor, Us-05, Us-04 and many lagers with basic Saflager.....7-8 bucks a pop for liquid as opposed to $1.50-2.50 for dry, with more cell count, is imho just a waste of money for the majority of a brewer's recipe bank...most commercial ales us a limited range of strains, and those liquid strains are really the same strains that the afore mentioned dry strains cover, for example Us-05 is the famed "Chico strain", so if you are paying 7-8 bucks for Wyeast 1056 American/Chico Ale Yeast, and you STILL have to make a starter to have enough viable cells, then you are ripping yourself off, in terms of time and money....

But if you are looking for a "clean" yeast profile, meaning about 90% of american ales, the 05, or nottingham is the way to go. Need "Bready" or yeasty for English ales, then 04 or windsor. Want a clean, low profile lager yeast- saflager usually does the trick.

That's one thing about dry...you don't need to reproduce anymore yeasts than are already in the packets of dry.

in fact any of the dry yeast haters should go back and read just what Palmer says about dry yeast.

Quote:
6.3 Yeast Forms

Yeast come in two main product forms, dry and liquid. (There is also another form, available as pure cultures on petri dishes or slants, but it is generally used as one would use liquid yeast.) Dry yeast are select, hardy strains that have been dehydrated for storability. There are a lot of yeast cells in a typical 7 gram packet. For best results, it needs to be re-hydrated before it is pitched. For the first-time brewer, a dry ale yeast is highly recommended.

Dry yeast is convenient for the beginning brewer because the packets provide a lot of viable yeast cells, they can be stored for extended periods of time and they can be prepared quickly on brewing day. It is common to use one or two packets (7 - 14 grams) of dried yeast for a typical five gallon batch. This amount of yeast, when properly re-hydrated, provides enough active yeast cells to ensure a strong fermentation. Dry yeast can be stored for extended periods (preferably in the refrigerator) but the packets do degrade with time. This is one of the pitfalls with brewing from the no-name yeast packets taped to the top of a can of malt extract. They are probably more than a year old and may not be very viable. It is better to buy another packet or three of a reputable brewer's yeast that has been kept in the refrigerator at the brewshop. Some leading and reliable brands of dry yeast are DCL Yeast, Yeast Labs (marketed by G.W. Kent, produced by Lallemand of Canada), Cooper's, DanStar (produced by Lallemand), Munton & Fison and Edme.

Dry yeasts are good but the rigor of the dehydration process limits the number of different ale strains that are available and in the case of dry lager yeast, eliminates them almost entirely. A few dry lager yeasts do exist, but popular opinion is that they behave more like ale yeasts than lager. DCL Yeast markets two strains of dry lager yeast, Saflager S-189 and S-23, though only S-23 is currently available in a homebrewing size. The recommended fermentation temperature is 48-59°F. I would advise you to use two packets per 5 gallon batch to be assured of a good pitching rate.

The only thing missing with dry yeast is real individuality, which is where liquid yeasts come in. Many more different strains of yeast are available in liquid form than in dry.
The only real "criticism" of dry yeast, is that, due to how they are made to be stable, that there are not many varieties available, that and the warning to avoid those "no-name" yeasts under the lids of extract can and to go with one of the "proven" strains.

No yeast bashing by him at all......So if HE doesn't bash dry yeast.....
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Old 10-30-2009, 07:25 PM   #15
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I wash dry yeast because washing yeast is EASY. I usually prep a lot of pint jars at one time though (like 12-24) and stick them in the fridge so they're ready to go when I rack.

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Old 10-30-2009, 07:31 PM   #16
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There are also those that believe that a yeast gets better the second or third time it's used. Even dry yeast.

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Old 10-30-2009, 07:32 PM   #17
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There are also those that believe that a yeast gets better the second or third time it's used. Even dry yeast.
That's Biermuncher's take on the matter, it appears.
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Old 11-01-2009, 04:59 PM   #18
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Its not that deep, It was just my first time trying to wash yeast and thats what I had....

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