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Old 12-06-2010, 08:47 PM   #1
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Default Starting Gravity and Ending Gravity

I'm just wondering about the relationship that starting and ending gravity have with each other.

I keep having batches that have a high ending gravity. One was 1.013 and this last one was 1.022.

Are these stuck fermentations? Both had a starting gravity of 1.042.

Do ending gravities need to be below a certain level?

Does the ending gravity correlate to the starting gravity?

Is there a desirable ending gravity and does the attenuation relate to anything other than alcohol %?

Sorry for the barrage of questions!


Thanks!

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Old 12-06-2010, 09:01 PM   #2
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Are these stuck fermentations? Both had a starting gravity of 1.042.
Not necessarily. % of fermentable sugars vs unfermenatbles vary. Not all sugars are able to be fermented by the yeast.

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Do ending gravities need to be below a certain level?
Per style yes, kind of. A higher FG will tend to mean a sweeter beer. Lower FG, drier.


Quote:
Does the ending gravity correlate to the starting gravity?
Yes, the difference will tell you how much alcohol you have in your beer. It really tells you how much sugar you have in your beer and the math takes over from there.

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Is there a desirable ending gravity and does the attenuation relate to anything other than alcohol %?
To each his own and again, different styles have different target ranges.

I for one, never check the FG. At that point, I don't care.
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Old 12-06-2010, 09:22 PM   #3
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I check the FG to make sure I got a reasonable attenuation. However, the FG also depends on a lot of factors. If you are extract brewing, it is really hard to get the FG below 1020 (at least it was for me) and for AG brewing it depends on your mash temps. Yeast health (and happiness) is also very important for attenuation.

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Old 12-06-2010, 09:34 PM   #4
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Thanks for the responses! Sorry I should have specified that my batches are all grain. I like my beers less sweet. Any tips to get that gravity down more or reduce the amount of unfermentable sugar in my brew? Thanks!

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Old 12-06-2010, 09:37 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by Fantastical View Post
Thanks for the responses! Sorry I should have specified that my batches are all grain. I like my beers less sweet. Any tips to get that gravity down more or reduce the amount of unfermentable sugar in my brew? Thanks!
Mash low, pitch more yeast.
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Old 12-06-2010, 09:40 PM   #6
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Depends of the type of beer you are brewing and the OG. Simple sugars like table sugar and honey are completely fermentable and if they are used to replace some of the malts then the FG will be lower and the beer will be drier. You could also mash lower. If I want to get some pretty good attenuation I will usually mash at 151-152. You can also help the yeast out too. When you see fermentation slow down, usually after 2-3 days depending, increase the temp about 4-5 degrees. This will ensure that they dont flocc out too early and keep fermenting. You wont have to worry about off flavors created by increasing the temp b/c by the time the beer as slowed down all of the flavors the yeast will give off have been made.

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Old 12-06-2010, 09:41 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by jbrookeiv View Post
Mash low, pitch more yeast.
Will that also reduce my starting gravity or just the sweetness of my beer?
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Old 12-06-2010, 09:43 PM   #8
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Oh and one more thing... By mashing low what temps do you mean? 150f?

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Old 12-06-2010, 09:49 PM   #9
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Mash low, pitch more yeast.
Also try to use grain that doesn't produce too much unfermentable sugars. For example, crystal grains contribute unfermentable sugars. That means a residual sweetness in the beer.
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Old 12-06-2010, 09:53 PM   #10
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The mash temp wont affect your OG

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