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Old 07-25-2012, 10:45 PM   #1
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Default Reducing sediment from keg

I've read a couple articles about how to reduce sediment from kegs. One said to cut an inch off the out tube another to shake the keg and of course pour out the sediment. But after the beer is all gone I seem to have alot of yeast and sediment stuck on the bottom of the keg. Pretty much looking for opinions or ways you help reduce your Sediment.

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Old 07-25-2012, 10:57 PM   #2
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Not kegging the beer too soon is the first thing you can do diminish the amount of trub in the keg. Another is too try crash cooling. It is essentially putting your fermenter in a fridge for a couple of days and then kegging. The cold temps help the beer to clear before you keg. No need to cut your dip tubes. If you take your time and don't rush the beer, you'll be able to toss the first pint and have good beer the rest of the way.

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Old 07-25-2012, 11:01 PM   #3
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Yup, whether it's bottling or kegging, reducing the amount of sediment before it gets to the serving container is key. Long primaries, using a secondary (either one works) using finnings, and crash cooling all work. If you are using a keezer, crash cooling is easy. Just stick the fermenter in there for a couple days before racking to kegs.

But even if you can't cold crash, I get very little if any sedimentation after a month in primary.

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Old 07-25-2012, 11:02 PM   #4
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Thanks and if I cold crash it I take it I will have to cold condition?

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Old 07-25-2012, 11:15 PM   #5
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Thanks and if I cold crash it I take it I will have to cold condition?
I'm not sure what you're asking. If you crash cool, you can rack it to the keg and keep it at whatever temperature you want. But I like to keep it cold, as it really clears up nicely.

I'm not one to cut my diptube. What I do is to keg the beer when it's clear, or nearly so, and then stick it in the kegerator. After about 5 days, I pour about 3 ounces of sludge out and dump it. And then the beer pours totally clear after that. There is some yeast sediment in the keg when the beer is gone- maybe 1/8 of a cup- but if you don't move the keg after you pour off the first three ounces, you won't have it in your beer at all.
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Old 07-25-2012, 11:39 PM   #6
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Transfer from your primary to the keg.
Cold crash your beer in the keg for a week or more under normal pressure.
Then make a jumper of two OUT quick disconnects and transfer your beer to another keg at 5 psi.
Put that keg back in your keezer under pressure for another week or two and you will have great clear beer.

I just transferred a beer that I primary fermented in the keg.
I cold crashed it before transferring from the primary keg and my yeast patty was nice and firm.
Like Yooper said...small amount of trub came out initially, but the rest was clear during the transfer.
My beer is now in the second keg, carbing up, and will be ready to serve in 5 - 10 days.

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Old 07-25-2012, 11:56 PM   #7
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I've not had any issue in my kegs. I simply give the beer long enough for the yeast to fully flocculate out, then transfer it without picking up any of the yeast cake. All the yeasts I'm using are rated high, or better, for flocculation. I also let them go at least 3 weeks before I transfer them. I also use a CO2 push to move my beer, so I'm not moving the fermenter an inch before starting the transfer. If you're using a bucket, or carboy, and not using a CO2 push, then try moving the fermenter at least several hours before you're going to transfer to keg. If you can, go a day or more between when you move it and transfer.

IMO, cutting the dip tube is a ghetto way to cover up other issues. Once you manage to figure out why you're having the issue, you'll then need to get new dip tubes to replace all the ones you cut. Those suckers are NOT cheap these days.

I have yet to see any sediment come out of my kegs when pouring (even the first pour). When I clean the kegs, there's a fine layer of sediment in the bottom of the keg, but it's below the level of the dip tube. I'm either lucky, or doing something really right.

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Old 07-25-2012, 11:57 PM   #8
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You can use yeast that Flocks-out and also add some moss tablets during the boil and rack to a secondary before going to the keg to let everything drop again.

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Old 07-26-2012, 12:08 AM   #9
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You can use yeast that Flocks-out and also add some moss tablets during the boil and rack to a secondary before going to the keg to let everything drop again.
Irish moss only helps with the cold break. Also, Whirlfloc is tablet form, Irish moss is loose. Plus, Irish moss is not actual moss but made from seaweed.

I've not racked a batch of beer to another vessel in an effort to get it to clear. Knowing how to transfer cleanly will get you much better results. Practice transferring from the fermenter to keg until you get the sediment level to a minimum.

IF you have a fermentation chamber, you could cold crash once fermentation, and bulk aging/conditioning, is finished. IMO, that's really not necessary for the majority of brews out there. As I've already mentioned, I get super clear brews without cold crashing, using fining agents in the fermenter, or any of the other methods many seem to need (or depend on for other reasons).
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Old 07-26-2012, 12:24 AM   #10
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If you don't want sediment don't keg sediment. You need to ask yourself,,, Do I want clear beer? or Do I want 5gallons? I seldom keg all the beer from the carboy, I usually never let the racking cane touch the bottom and as soon as I see splooge in the siphon we are done. Yea some times I dump a quart or two out but the beer is clear the tubes aren't cut and life is good

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