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Old 10-02-2012, 04:36 PM   #1
joepezHB
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Default Pros and cons

I am looking to naturally carbonate my American Pale Ale in my Keg. What are the Pros and Cons to this.

The reason is because I am getting stationed elsewhere and need to move ASAP. I wanted to naturally condition it and keep in there for the few weeks that I take leave and have it ready to serve when I get to my new duty station and have a house warming party.

I usually bottle condition but I wanted to step up my game and I done have a big freezer to force carbonate the beer, yet.

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Old 10-02-2012, 04:42 PM   #2
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I don't think either one is better than the other. I tried to naturally condition my keg once and it didn't seal tight enough to trap the gas. So I gave up on it. FWIW, I'd just bottle condition this one. Then you don't have to worry. Moving is bad enough.

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Old 10-02-2012, 04:59 PM   #3
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I naturally carb in the keg all the time. The only disadvantage to me is that it takes longer. I do seat the opening on the keg with a hit of co2 first though to avoid the problem Double_D mentioned.

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Old 10-02-2012, 05:00 PM   #4
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Quote:
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I naturally carb in the keg all the time. The only disadvantage to me is that it takes longer. I do seat the opening on the keg with a hit of co2 first though to avoid the problem Double_D mentioned.
I tried that too. I have since replaced my lids though.
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Old 10-02-2012, 05:02 PM   #5
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Cons: takes longer; harder to control than force carbing; more sediment in kegs

Pros: none that I can think of

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Old 10-02-2012, 05:06 PM   #6
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I tend to think that the "pros" of naturally carbonating are that
1) I think that I like the 'finer' carbonation that it gives over forced CO2. I guess this could also be all in my head, but I like it, so I do it occasionally.
2) If I don't have room in the keezer to force carb it, I'll just naturally carb it.

And I agree with Denny on the cons.


Teehee. See what I did there?

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Old 10-02-2012, 05:06 PM   #7
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I'm interested in this as well. There are a couple Nano-Breweries around town that talk about how they only bottle condition their beer, though I suspect they condition them right in the keg. Either way, there is something they personally like about how it finishes their brew.

I don't imagine there is much difference between conditioning it in a bottle or keg, but what sort of differences do you get with your beer when bottle conditioning vs. force carbing your beer?

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Old 10-02-2012, 06:04 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AmandaK View Post
I tend to think that the "pros" of naturally carbonating are that
1) I think that I like the 'finer' carbonation that it gives over forced CO2. I guess this could also be all in my head, but I like it, so I do it occasionally.
2) If I don't have room in the keezer to force carb it, I'll just naturally carb it.

And I agree with Denny on the cons.


Teehee. See what I did there?
Amanda, the reason it appears to have finer carbonation is because it takes longer, which gives the CO2 more time to go into solution. Many years ago, i conducted an experiment by priming with sugar, DME, honey, force carbing and a couple other methods I've forgotten now,calculating it so that all would have the same level. After 2 months of conditioning, none of my tasters could tell which was which nor had a preference for one over another. BTW, you don't need to have the keg cold to force carb it. I always force carb mine at room temp, just because that's the most practical way for me to do it.

And I wish I had a clever zinger like you did!
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Old 10-02-2012, 06:23 PM   #9
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If I wanted to force carb at room temp how would I go about it?

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Old 10-02-2012, 06:59 PM   #10
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Look up the pressure for room temp on the carb charts. It will be around 20 psi.

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