Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Beer Discussion > Propane- what would blow me up?
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 02-12-2013, 07:20 PM   #21
ACbrewer
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Fredericksburg, VA
Posts: 1,553
Liked 95 Times on 86 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

I'd be surprised if a tank sold in the last 20years didn't have all the safty features that prevent it from exploding, etc. Heck they are supposed to have a shutoff design that will close the valve if they detect the gas is being used to fast - and on it goes. there was a good Mythbusters episided where they tried to get a tank to explode in a fire. They had to pretty much disassemble the valve on it.

With that said, if you can smell the propane, then your tank is leaking and it should discarded (if it is a blue rhino, I think they are swaped then checked and fixed/discarded)...

__________________
ACbrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-12-2013, 07:26 PM   #22
BobbiLynn
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 2,951
Liked 791 Times on 539 Posts
Likes Given: 389

Default

Maybe I don't need tools to change mine either, just no idea what I'm doing. When it was hissing from the top of the tank, I could smell propane coming from it. Still waiting for friend to get here. *sigh*

__________________
BobbiLynn is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-12-2013, 07:28 PM   #23
ACbrewer
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Fredericksburg, VA
Posts: 1,553
Liked 95 Times on 86 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Well if you can smell it, then it is there, and I'd stop cooking near it (ignition concern). I'd tighten the valve down and swap. I know it is fustrating, but it is the right move. Hope your friend with tools gets there soon, and takes notes so you can swap next time.

__________________
ACbrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-12-2013, 09:10 PM   #24
RM-MN
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Solway, MN
Posts: 7,150
Liked 856 Times on 713 Posts
Likes Given: 319

Default

All of the small tanks have a pressure relief valve built in so the tank will not explode or BLEVE. When it gets enough pressure, well below that which would cause a rupture, the valve opens and releases propane. This release causes the tank to cool and the pressure goes down. The valve closes again and is there waiting in case the pressure goes too high. I've seen a 100 lb tank sitting next to a burning building. When the valve opens and there is flame available to ignite the gas released it makes a pretty blue flame about 30 feet long from the side of the tank. Don't be standing near it.

Propane used outdoors (as it always should be) is not particularly dangerous. Natural air movement will keep the propane from forming a large pool and will quickly dissipate it. If the leak did catch fire it would only burn, not explode. All you need to do is put on some leather gloves and reach in to close the tank valve. No problem.

__________________
RM-MN is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-12-2013, 09:12 PM   #25
JeepDiver
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Highlands Ranch, CO
Posts: 1,322
Liked 143 Times on 112 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Check the oring on the end of the hose. I have an old fish cooker that I used for 10 years with no problems. Moved here to Denver and I have to replace the oring ever 3 months now. First time I found the issue I smelled gas while starting my boil. The flame was between me and the tank lucked out on that one. I done think New cookers are set up the same but old ones that require tools to change will have an oring on the end of the hose

__________________
JeepDiver is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-12-2013, 09:21 PM   #26
BobbiLynn
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 2,951
Liked 791 Times on 539 Posts
Likes Given: 389

Default

Friend showed up a while back, switched tanks, just adjustable wrench like I thought. He said the o ring? that attaches the tubing was leaking slightly but not to worry about it. Back in business... need to finish this batch so I can start the other one. Happy brew day dance!

__________________
BobbiLynn is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-12-2013, 09:22 PM   #27
BobbiLynn
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 2,951
Liked 791 Times on 539 Posts
Likes Given: 389

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JeepDiver View Post
Check the oring on the end of the hose. I have an old fish cooker that I used for 10 years with no problems. Moved here to Denver and I have to replace the oring ever 3 months now. First time I found the issue I smelled gas while starting my boil. The flame was between me and the tank lucked out on that one. I done think New cookers are set up the same but old ones that require tools to change will have an oring on the end of the hose
I'll figure out how to change that later.... busy now...
__________________
BobbiLynn is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-12-2013, 09:29 PM   #28
OrdinaryAvgGuy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Cary, NC - North Carolina
Posts: 967
Liked 180 Times on 127 Posts
Likes Given: 108

Default

I like to check for leaks by wavering a match near the line fittings.

I kid. I kid DNTTAH

__________________
Primary: -
Bottled: X-mas ale, Southern Tier Pumking Ale, Sierra Nevada Torpedo Clone
OrdinaryAvgGuy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-12-2013, 10:41 PM   #29
Huff360
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Madison, Alabama
Posts: 419
Liked 50 Times on 40 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Evan_L View Post
The flame kept getting sucked back into the venturi and then it would start burning at the connection between the gas line and venturi. ... can the flame travel back up to the tank when this happens? Is there something I can do to correct this when it happens or do I need to shut off the gas and relight like I was doing?

This is called "burning in the throat" and it is not exceptionally dangerous. It isn't good for the burner but it is not going to cause anything to explode.

The flame can not burn any further back than the orifice because there is no oxygen in the hose or the tank.
__________________
Huff360 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-13-2013, 03:52 AM   #30
Evan_L
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Willimantic, CT
Posts: 429
Liked 75 Times on 51 Posts
Likes Given: 62

Default

Cool, thanks.

__________________
Evan_L is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
For Sale - Kettle, propane and propane accessories - Duluth, MN Tinga For Sale 2 10-25-2012 07:41 AM
connections lines from 25lb propane tank to propane Hot water heater slash5bmw Equipment/Sanitation 1 10-24-2012 07:19 AM
propane or propane and electric wardenwheat Equipment/Sanitation 0 08-04-2010 05:01 AM
Excess blow-off??? Now even the blow-off is fermenting... beowulf Fermentation & Yeast 3 07-13-2010 12:17 PM
some propane and propane accessories ?'s tbulger Equipment/Sanitation 0 02-29-2008 04:48 PM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS