Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Winners Re-Re-Re-Re-Drawn - 24 hours to Claim!

Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Beer Discussion > Plato vs. specific gravity
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 10-23-2010, 04:37 AM   #11
HItransplant
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Portlandia
Posts: 1,034
Liked 7 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by GilaMinumBeer View Post
Or, IIRC

260 / ( 260 / P ) = SG
sorry to bump up an old thread but I just spent 30 min (with my wife) dragging algebra out of our very dusty math brains to find that this equation is wrong. I wanted to solve for P so that I could make a spreadsheet to compare plato and specific gravity.

when I solved for P in this equation, I ended up with this: P = SG.


the equation up a couple of posts seems to be correct and I was able to solve for P to make a spreadsheet that takes SG and spits out Plato. That way I can more easily compare.

thought Id share the plato equivalent of 1.01- 1.107. Id attach the spreadsheet but Im not sure I can or if I know how.

edit: now that I spent the time to solve for P, I realize I didnt need to.. hah!! anyway, maybe its helpful, maybe nobody cares.


SG Plato
1.01 2.5
1.011 2.75
1.012 3
1.013 3.25
1.014 3.5
1.015 3.75
1.016 4
1.017 4.25
1.018 4.5
1.019 4.75
1.02 5
1.021 5.25
1.022 5.5
1.023 5.75
1.024 6
1.025 6.25
1.026 6.5
1.027 6.75
1.028 7
1.029 7.25
1.03 7.5
1.031 7.75
1.032 8
1.033 8.25
1.034 8.5
1.035 8.75
1.036 9
1.037 9.25
1.038 9.5
1.039 9.75
1.04 10
1.041 10.25
1.042 10.5
1.043 10.75
1.044 11
1.045 11.25
1.046 11.5
1.047 11.75
1.048 12
1.049 12.25
1.05 12.5
1.051 12.75
1.052 13
1.053 13.25
1.054 13.5
1.055 13.75
1.056 14
1.057 14.25
1.058 14.5
1.059 14.75
1.06 15
1.061 15.25
1.062 15.5
1.063 15.75
1.064 16
1.065 16.25
1.066 16.5
1.067 16.75
1.068 17
1.069 17.25
1.07 17.5
1.071 17.75
1.072 18
1.073 18.25
1.074 18.5
1.075 18.75
1.076 19
1.077 19.25
1.078 19.5
1.079 19.75
1.08 20
1.081 20.25
1.082 20.5
1.083 20.75
1.084 21
1.085 21.25
1.086 21.5
1.087 21.75
1.088 22
1.089 22.25
1.09 22.5
1.091 22.75
1.092 23
1.093 23.25
1.094 23.5
1.095 23.75
1.096 24
1.097 24.25
1.098 24.5
1.099 24.75
1.1 25
1.101 25.25
1.102 25.5
1.103 25.75
1.104 26
1.105 26.25
1.106 26.5
1.107 26.75
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlindLemonLars View Post
It's comfort foam. :D
Quote:
Originally Posted by EdWort View Post
It's a gentle recipe, so your first time will be enjoyable and memorable. :D
HItransplant is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-23-2010, 01:18 PM   #12
rico567
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
rico567's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Central IL
Posts: 3,018
Liked 83 Times on 78 Posts
Likes Given: 21

Default

There are converters available in several places on the Internet that will change SG <-> Brix with the touch of a key. For our purposes, Brix may be considered equivalent to Plato. On brewday, when I'm using my refractometer, all I do is multiply x 4 in my head, and it's close enough. For virtually all homebrewing, the idea that ± .002 - .003 point on FG is going to make any noticeable difference in the finished product is just trying to grind WAY too much point on a pencil.

As far as systems of measurement, there are plenty of historical references on the Internet (and real, paper books) that discuss this. Traditional systems (like the "English" - SAE, etc. system) are based on handy everyday units, what we might call "human." (e.g. human sized)

Science has come to use the metric system, which is very good indeed for science and industrial applications. But there is nothing natural/human in a milliliter or a microgram (as there actually WERE in furlongs and fortnights), nothing much in everyday experience corresponds to these things.....so maybe it shouldn't be used everywhere, despite those who believe it should be imposed on everyone, everywhere.

We believe it's OK to be bilingual, nobody these days would think it strange that I speak both English and Spanish (and enough German, Italian, French, Mandarin & Japanese to order beer), so why on earth would anyone believe that it's necessary to have The One True System of Measurement?

__________________

“Malt does more than Milton can / To justify God’s ways to man”

-A. E. Housman (1859–1936). A Shropshire Lad , 1896.

rico567 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-12-2011, 10:06 PM   #13
AzimuthBrewery
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma
Posts: 9
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Today I think I've decided to switch to Plato from SG for the simple fact that when taking a hydrometer reading in cloudy (wheat) beer the Plato scale is much easier to read i.e. 5ºP is approx 20 SG points which can be frustrating to get an exact reading on with the more bunched up scale. I like everyone else's reasons too.

__________________

"Brewers enjoy working to make beer as much as drinking beer instead of working."
-Harold Rudolph

AzimuthBrewery is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-12-2011, 11:12 PM   #14
DeafSmith
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
DeafSmith's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Richardson, TX
Posts: 1,448
Liked 33 Times on 31 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by HItransplant View Post

thought Id share the plato equivalent of 1.01- 1.107. Id attach the spreadsheet but Im not sure I can or if I know how.

edit: now that I spent the time to solve for P, I realize I didnt need to.. hah!! anyway, maybe its helpful, maybe nobody cares.


SG Plato
1.01 2.5
1.011 2.75
.
.
.
.

1.106 26.5
1.107 26.75

The 4:1 conversion isn't exactly linear - it begins to diverge above about 11 Plato. By the time you get up to 1.084 SG, the Plato equivalent is 20.2, not 21. See Table 31, page 266 in the 3rd edition of Palmer's "How to Brew".
__________________
DeafSmith is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-16-2011, 09:52 PM   #15
Bob
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Christiansted, St Croix, USVI, US Virgin Islands
Posts: 3,921
Liked 127 Times on 95 Posts
Likes Given: 36

Default

The 4:1 conversion is worthless above 12°P (~1.048). Plato was arrived at empirically, not mathematically.

{Plato/(258.6-([Plato/258.2]*227.1)}+1 = Specific gravity

That'll get you very close indeed.

There are also a lot of charts available on the Internet. That's what I use when I'm using my refractometer on brew day, not an equation.

Bob

__________________

Brewmaster
Fort Christian Brewpub
St Croix, US Virgin Islands

Bob is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-18-2011, 08:25 PM   #16
livewir
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Saint Louis, MO
Posts: 70
Default

I asked a local Microbrew why they use plato and their answer was pretty straight forward, all the neato digital equipment they use to measure gravity is in plato.

__________________

Marcus Hickory Brewhaus

Primary: ESB
Secondary:
Bottled: Bourbon Stout
Keg: Dubbel, Rye Ale
Up Next:
livewir is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-19-2011, 12:04 AM   #17
Brewerforlife
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Marquette, MICHIGAN
Posts: 246
Liked 7 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 108

Default

I am A pro-brewer, and still use my hydrometer most of the time. I do have both, A refractometer for quick pre-ferm measurements, and a set of 3 (plato) sacchrometers. The problem with the sacch. is it takes such a large sample jar, becuase the sacchrometer is so large. It takes a set of 3 to cover the whole range of a standard S.G hydrometer, so they are a little more accurate & easier to read becuase of the large distance between increments. There is a good conversion chart in Palmer's book on page# 266. He also states that : wort deg. Plato is= deg. Brix divided by 1.04. You can get a set of sacchrometers at Crosby&Baker for around 60$. Probably a waste of money at homebrew level, because of the large sample needed. Hope this help's. Cheers!!!

__________________
Brewerforlife is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-19-2011, 01:52 AM   #18
KFBass
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Hamilton, ON
Posts: 132
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Im at a weird cross roads in brewing calcs. I work in a brewery and we use palto, celcius, and kilo's since we're canadian. I was brought up homebrewing reading this forum and popular books so most of the time im converting to SG, F, and lbs. Tho I'm starting to understand it a bit better in Metric. The problem is 122F doesnt have any relavance to me but 30C does.

We use plato hydrometers, with different ones calibrated for sg and fg. I do it cause my brewmaster does it. And I probably keep on doin so cause that's the language of the industry. Same in music, we speak strange terms cause everyone else does and its how we can communicate.

__________________
KFBass is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-19-2011, 02:00 AM   #19
KFBass
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Hamilton, ON
Posts: 132
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rico567 View Post

As far as systems of measurement, there are plenty of historical references on the Internet (and real, paper books) that discuss this. Traditional systems (like the "English" - SAE, etc. system) are based on handy everyday units, what we might call "human." (e.g. human sized)

Science has come to use the metric system, which is very good indeed for science and industrial applications. But there is nothing natural/human in a milliliter or a microgram (as there actually WERE in furlongs and fortnights), nothing much in everyday experience corresponds to these things.....
To give some reference, 1kg = the mass of 1L of water, almsot exactly. 1gm is = to 1ml of water or 1cc of water at Standard temp and pressure. There is also the nature of mass vs weight. You will weigh more in lbs on jupiter due to the nature of gravity, though your mass in kgs will stay the same. Also, work is being done now to have the kg based on Plank's constant rather then a man made-ish artifact.
__________________
KFBass is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-19-2011, 03:15 AM   #20
Bob
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Christiansted, St Croix, USVI, US Virgin Islands
Posts: 3,921
Liked 127 Times on 95 Posts
Likes Given: 36

Default

+1 to the set of calibrated Plato hydrometers/saccharometers. I don't know where I'd be without mine; I've had them since my earliest days brewing professionally.

I don't really perceive losses with the sample size on a homebrew scale, because I factor them in to start with. And I take samples far more often than most homebrewers, because I like to practice yeast management.

I like to use the appropriate tool for the job. In the brewhouse, it's my refractometer. In the rest of the production chain, it's saccharometers.

Those different scale saccharometers are a GODSEND when you're learning. They're infinitely better tools than the standard LHBS hydrometer, because they're so much more precise. It's like a grocery-store dial thermometer vs. a calibrated digital unit; both will work, but the digital unit is more precise.

Also +1 to thinking about temperature in Celsius, especially for step mashes.

Cheers,

Bob

__________________

Brewmaster
Fort Christian Brewpub
St Croix, US Virgin Islands

Bob is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Specific Gravity?!?! cmorgan Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 8 12-30-2009 03:46 AM
specific gravity castillo Fermentation & Yeast 3 09-22-2009 08:44 AM
Specific Gravity? Target Gravity? HalloweenGod General Techniques 6 01-03-2009 07:30 PM
specific gravity scanld General Beer Discussion 1 05-18-2008 03:09 PM
specific gravity beerme70 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 3 05-12-2008 05:05 AM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS