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Old 09-09-2011, 12:33 AM   #1
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Default Overcarbonated

I brewed what was supposed to be a 5 gallon batch of rye pale ale. It turned out be 3 3/4 gallons. I primed it with 3/4 cup of table sugar. The only way i can keep it managable is to get it close to freezing temps but even then it foams big time. Any tips on drinking the rest of this batch. Also are there primers that work well with some beers but not others? Any tips on this whole subject would be fantastic

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Old 09-09-2011, 01:36 AM   #2
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Overcarbed eh Well this happened to me a while back... Granted that's what I was going for... But it decided to shoot up and spray my ceiling ( my initiation into homebrewing) so what I learned the greatest way of taking care of this... Using ur bottle opener and slightly allow some of the hiss to go until it mostly stops then your good you prob will have a big huge head though

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Old 09-09-2011, 09:48 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Ma23456
Overcarbed eh Well this happened to me a while back... Granted that's what I was going for... But it decided to shoot up and spray my ceiling ( my initiation into homebrewing) so what I learned the greatest way of taking care of this... Using ur bottle opener and slightly allow some of the hiss to go until it mostly stops then your good you prob will have a big huge head though
Yeah i found that if the beer is even relatively warm it takes an extremely long time to equalize. Well i guess i will be chalking this one up to experience and lesson learned.
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Old 09-09-2011, 10:38 PM   #4
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You can uncap all the bottles, let them "foam out" in the sink for 15 minutes or so, then re-cap them. You end up losing some beer, but it works. I had to do this on two batches 3 years ago. Ever since, I've been super anal about priming sugar amounts and the amount of beer to be primed and have had no problems.

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Old 09-09-2011, 11:27 PM   #5
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You can empty the beer into a bowl or some other large container that holds many several times the volume of the bottle, stir with a spoon, and when the carbonation is at a tolerable level pour it into a glass. Or you could just use the beer in cooking, chili, beer-cheese soup, marinade, etc.

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Old 09-10-2011, 01:31 AM   #6
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For future reference, prime your beers by weight of priming sugar...there are plenty of calculators our there that take into account both the volume that you are bottling, as well as the temperature (which is a surrogate for the CO2 that is already dissolved in solution from fermentation). I use this one, which I also find handy as it incorporates a reference of recommended volumes of CO2 for various styles.

In regards to your current problem, the one time this happened to me, I ended up using super cold temps and very slow, careful openings, and still lost a bunch of brew. I ended up using the last three 22 oz bombers to try the freeze concentration technique...came out pretty good, even if it wasn't something that I would want to try/drink all the time. Perhaps you could try it yourself with some of the remaining bottles....

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Old 09-10-2011, 01:37 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biochemedic;3243643 there are plenty of calculators our there that take into account both the volume that you are bottling, as well as the temperature (which is a surrogate for the CO2 that is already dissolved in solution from fermentation). I use [URL="http://www.tastybrew.com/calculators/priming.html"
this one[/URL], which I also find handy as it incorporates a reference of recommended volumes of CO2 for various styles.
I use that calculator also...works very well.
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Old 09-11-2011, 11:20 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biochemedic
For future reference, prime your beers by weight of priming sugar...there are plenty of calculators our there that take into account both the volume that you are bottling, as well as the temperature (which is a surrogate for the CO2 that is already dissolved in solution from fermentation). I use this one, which I also find handy as it incorporates a reference of recommended volumes of CO2 for various styles.

In regards to your current problem, the one time this happened to me, I ended up using super cold temps and very slow, careful openings, and still lost a bunch of brew. I ended up using the last three 22 oz bombers to try the freeze concentration technique...came out pretty good, even if it wasn't something that I would want to try/drink all the time. Perhaps you could try it yourself with some of the remaining bottles....
What is freeze concentration
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Old 09-11-2011, 02:24 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Willbrew View Post
What is freeze concentration
Essentially, partially freezing the beer then filtering out the ice, which removes water and leaves the alcohol. It will also concentrate the flavor and sweetness. Sometimes referred to freeze "distillation," which is actually a misnomer.
There are a couple of threads on the board here you can search for using either term, and there's an old Basic Brewing Video episode on it.
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Old 09-13-2011, 02:40 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by biochemedic

Essentially, partially freezing the beer then filtering out the ice, which removes water and leaves the alcohol. It will also concentrate the flavor and sweetness. Sometimes referred to freeze "distillation," which is actually a misnomer.
There are a couple of threads on the board here you can search for using either term, and there's an old Basic Brewing Video episode on it.
Thanks for the info. I will check it out, im up for trying new ideas.
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