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Old 12-11-2010, 09:27 PM   #1
avibayer
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Default Noob questions: Chiller and Yeast Nutrient

Brewing a Brown Ale right now with 1332 northwest. Its an all grain batch.

1) should i add yeast nutrient? i dont have my local water information, but since its an all grain batch, and i dont have many adjuncts, there should be plenty of FAN. Would adding yeast nutrient help/hurt? If it helps, how much do i add for a 5 gallon batch and at what stage?

2) i dont have a working chiller at the moment. Hours spent getting the wrong size copper and fittings has slowed my DIY project, and i dont have one. I can do an ice bath, or let it sit out over night, and cool. Is there a problem letting it just cool over night?

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Old 12-11-2010, 09:58 PM   #2
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No, you don't need any nutrient.

Try and cool as quick as possible. You can cool slowly overnight, and you may be lucky, but if anything gets in there, it will breed like mad overnight. Between the temperatures of about 140 F and 80 F the kettle acts like an incubator, and the wort is great food for bugs. A covered kettle will retain it's temperature for hours.

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Old 12-11-2010, 10:16 PM   #3
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In the past i have covered it and left it out over night. I have had some bret infections also. Is that a possible cause?

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Old 12-11-2010, 11:02 PM   #4
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At the end of the boil, it is important to cool the wort quickly. While it is still hot, (above 140°F) bacteria and wild yeasts are inhibited. But it is very susceptible to oxidation damage as it cools. There are also the previously mentioned sulfur compounds that evolve from the wort while it is hot. If the wort is cooled slowly, dimethyl sulfide will continue to be produced in the wort without being boiled off; causing off-flavors in the finished beer. The objective is to rapidly cool the wort to below 80°F before oxidation or contamination can occur.

Rapid cooling also forms the Cold Break. This is composed of another group of proteins that need to be thermally shocked into precipitating out of the wort. Slow cooling will not affect them. Cold break, or rather the lack of it, is the cause of Chill Haze. When a beer is chilled for drinking, these proteins partially precipitate forming a haze. As the beer warms up, the proteins re-dissolve. Only by rapid chilling from near-boiling to room temperature will the Cold Break proteins permanently precipitate and not cause Chill Haze. Chill haze is usually regarded as a cosmetic problem. You cannot taste it. However, chill haze indicates that there is an appreciable level of cold-break-type protein in the beer, which has been linked to long-term stability problems. Hazy beer tends to become stale sooner than non-hazy beer
just copied and pasted from Palmer's How to Brew. I usually just buy a couple bags of ice and use the kitchen sink to cool it down.
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Old 12-11-2010, 11:31 PM   #5
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very helpful . Thanks. Gonna go with bucket of water and ice. Labor intensive and it will hopefully motivate me to finish building my immersion chiller. I just wish i was better at soldering/ got the right size piping from home depot.

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Old 12-11-2010, 11:33 PM   #6
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Yes, use 1/2 tsp. rehydrated Wyeast yeast nutrient during the last 10 minutes of the boil & oxygen for 1-2 minutes just before you transfer to the primary fermenter. Using this routine I always get a fast start and a complete fermentation, try it this way, you'll like the results.

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