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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Beer Discussion > moving: new brew set up advice
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Old 08-21-2011, 06:33 AM   #1
Diaperload
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Default moving: new brew set up advice

So I'm going to be moving next weekend and I'll have to rethink my brewing.

Currently, I'm doing extract brews on my stovetop. Boilovers....who cares. You see, the duplex I live in is scheduled to be demolished in a few months. So when I move I have to do zero clean-up. However, my new place I won't have this ability. I'll have to brew someplace besides the stovetop.

Here's what I'm thinking:

1. I have a big plastic cuttingboard. I could purchase an electric burner, place it on the cutting board and brew. Boilovers wouldn't be that big of a deal.

2. Brew at work. I work in a 50's style burger joint that my family has owned for 30 years. Brewing after hours is no big deal. The drawback is bringing 5 gallon buckets full of beer home. I can see this being a huge PITA!

3. Purchase an outdoor propane burner. This is what a lot of people do (so I've read). The drawback is brewing in the winter here in Oregon. I brew at night mainly and brewing in the dark while it is cold as heck will only make me brew less. I can already see it.

So I'm leaning towards purchasing an electric burner.

Is brewing inside with propane feasible?

Do electric burner totally suck ass?

Any opinions or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

My new quadplex has a smallish garage that will be pretty much taken up by my toy car. SOME storage available in garage but not much.

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Old 08-21-2011, 06:39 AM   #2
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Fermcap-s, that should take care of your boil overs.

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Old 08-21-2011, 06:42 AM   #3
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What is a fermcap? I'll do a google search and see what comes up.

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Old 08-21-2011, 06:54 AM   #4
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Brewing at work if it is a quality restaurant kitchen makes everything easy. Use corny kegs for transport and ferment - much better than buckets.

But, brewing at work could get you or your family restaurant in legal troubles - especially if you are serving beer in the restaurant.

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Old 08-21-2011, 07:02 AM   #5
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We don't serve alcohol at our restaurant and I wouldn't risk our business by giving/selling my brew to customers.

We don't have burners though. We have a grill and some deep fryers. In the back we have a huge stainless steel countertop and a 3 bay stainless steel sink.

If I brewed at work I'd still have to purchase an electric burner.

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Old 08-21-2011, 07:16 AM   #6
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i have transported beer in fermenters. my advice is to only transport it when the yeast isn't active (right after pitching yeast or after fermentation is complete).

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Old 08-21-2011, 08:31 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diaperload View Post
3. Purchase an outdoor propane burner. This is what a lot of people do (so I've read). The drawback is brewing in the winter here in Oregon. I brew at night mainly and brewing in the dark while it is cold as heck will only make me brew less. I can already see it.
Heh, it doesn't get that cold in Portland. Get the propane burner. It will keep you warm on those soggy nights.
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Old 08-21-2011, 03:37 PM   #8
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I'd say get the propane burner and buy some sort of light if its typically dark when you brew.

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Old 08-21-2011, 04:53 PM   #9
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Boil it at work, cool it, cart it home (aeration at that point is OK), and pitch the yeast when you get home.

Also, that way you're not actually brewing beer on the premises. You're just boiling some grains in water.

As an alternative to a little electric burner, I'd think an electric turkey fryer (and maybe a DIY heatstick to supplement) would probably have more power.

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Old 08-21-2011, 05:10 PM   #10
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If you enjoy a few homebrews while brewing (which I know I do!) you might want to make it work at your place and not at the restaurant for both the safety of the business and the drive home. It sounds like you will have to buy the same equipment either way so why brew at one location and transport it to another?

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