The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Beer Discussion > Mash Tun Spent Grain Pizza

View Poll Results: Have you ever made spent grain pizza dough
Never 78 87.64%
I tried, but it didn't turn out well 0 0%
I have but it was only ok 2 2.25%
I have made great spent grain pizza dough 9 10.11%
Voters: 89. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 06-09-2010, 05:40 AM   #1
mr_tripp
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Lake St. Louis
Posts: 92
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default Mash Tun Spent Grain Pizza



Ok, it really isn't from the Mash Tun, but you can use grain from the mash tun. I used grains from an extract brew. This recipe was with Carmel 60 grains. I really can't share brewing recipes yet because I just started a few months ago, but I am pleased to share this one.

I used Alewife's recipe with slight modifications (my changes are in italics and red). Thanks Alewife! This pizza was amazing, better than my normal dough that I make, and my wife and friends love my other dough. I even think this was better than 21st Amendment in San Francisco. My dough was nice and crispy on the outside and soft and fluffy on the inside. This will be served in my brewpub when I retire...in 20 years.

Recipe with modifications:

Alewife's Spent Grain Pizza Dough:

Yeast Starter
1 pkg. dry bread yeast
1/2 cup warm water
1/2 tsp sugar

Ingredients
1/4 cup olive oil
2 T sugar
1 tsp salt
3 - 3 1/2 cups of flour (I used bread flour)
Cornmeal (optional)

Spent Grain Mixture
1 cup spent grains
1/2 cup water


Proof yeast by mixing with 1/2 cup warm water and 1/2 tsp sugar. Let sit 5-10 minutes--a nice layer of foam should prove that the yeast is alive and well.

In large mixing bowl, mix together olive oil, sugar, and salt. Blend in yeast mixture. Stir in 1 cup flour until well blended. Set aside while you prepare the grains.

Add 1 cup spent grains (drained well, but still wet) and 1/2 cup water to food processor. Process until you have a semi smooth mixture. It doesn't ever get really smooth, but you don't want it too chunky either.

Change food processor blade to plastic dough blade (optional)

Add yeast slurry to grain mixture and mix together well. Add remaining cups flour, 1 cup at a time, mixing well with each addition. (if using a food processor, mix until the dough forms a ball and naturally removes most of the dough from the side of the bowl) I do this by hand with a wooden spoon. It goes quickly, but you could do it in a mixer with a dough hook if you wanted. The last cup of flour will make the dough seem pretty stiff if you are mixing by hand, but it's ok! Don't worry. It's still a bit sticky, but will clean the side of the bowl. I just use my hands at the end and knead it together right in the bowl.

When you have a rough lump of dough together and the sides of the bowl are clean, push the dough ball to one side and add a bit of olive oil to the bottom of the bowl. Push the dough into the oil and flip it over, smoothing the oil over the top of the dough. Reshape the dough into an even round. Cover lightly and place in a warm place to rise for about an hour. (I divided the dough into 2 dough balls and put them in a bowl with olive oil and wrapped them with plastic wrap and put them in the fridge over night. I have read that putting the dough in the fridge over night makes a big difference, and I think it does. Then I take the dough out of the fridge about 2 hours before I want to bake the pizza. I also will freeze some dough for future. Just wrap each ball with plastic wrap and put them in a zip lock to freeze, then let them thaw in the fridge, and take them out 2 hours before you bake)


When ready to use, push dough down, deflating it. Bring sides in to center and flip dough over. Put dough out onto floured board and pat out evenly. Cut dough into equal sized pieces for each pizza you will make. If making all pizzas, you should have 8 equal sized pieces of dough. Shape each piece into an evenly round ball and place on a cookie sheet. Cover lightly and let sit 20-30 minutes. When ready to bake, take each little round of dough and pat it out on the floured board (I use corn meal) into an evenly round shape. You can use a rolling pin if you want to speed the process up a bit. I like them about 9" around for a thin crust pizza. Obviously, a thicker pizza would need to be pushed or rolled out to a smaller round. Once they are rolled out, top with what you like and bake as you usually would. (my directions changed a little. Alewife called for 4 cups of flour, I only used about 3 and I divided the dough into only 2 balls, but I wanted a thicker crust. I made a 14 inch and a deep dish Chicago Style pizza using pizza/baking stones. As far as toppings, I like to use spaghetti sauce instead of pizza sauce and I used thick mozzarella cheese, peperoni, and pizza spices)

This works better with a thin to medium crust pizza -- not so great in a Chicago or deep dish style (I disagree, my Chicago Style was great). The grains add a nice crispiness to a thinner crust. It works well on a BBQ grill, too!

Let me know if you have any questions.
__________________
mr_tripp is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-09-2010, 12:35 PM   #2
artyboy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 266
Default

Sweet. I made some bread from some spent grain a while back. It turned out really good. It's just too much of a pain to dry it out. I really need to get a dehydrator and a better mill.

__________________

Last edited by artyboy; 06-09-2010 at 12:38 PM.
artyboy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-09-2010, 01:14 PM   #3
chrislehr
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Austin
Posts: 358
Liked 10 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

hmm.. we have a dehydrator, and the woman cooks bread ALL the time. Linking her to this.

__________________
chrislehr is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-09-2010, 01:41 PM   #4
mr_tripp
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Lake St. Louis
Posts: 92
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

The food processor does a decent job of grinding the grains. There were no hard pieces of grain in the pizza dough.

I was at Costco a few months back and they were doing demonstrations of the Blentec blenders and they turned all kinds of grains into powder. Too bad they cost over $400.

__________________
mr_tripp is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-09-2010, 04:00 PM   #5
nilo
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
nilo's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 722
Liked 23 Times on 20 Posts

Default

What about the husks on the spent grains?

__________________
nilo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-09-2010, 05:42 PM   #6
noble13
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Eagle, WI
Posts: 99
Default

Grain pizza - I bet it goes good with beer! Seems a great thing to make, though I may wait until the weather cools.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nilo View Post
What about the husks on the spent grains?
The husks are minor in granola, which is mostly grain. I haven't made pizza or bread with spent grain, but I can't imagine the husks would be an issue since the grain is a minor ingredient.
__________________
noble13 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-09-2010, 06:53 PM   #7
mr_tripp
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Lake St. Louis
Posts: 92
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nilo View Post
What about the husks on the spent grains?
Fiber!

And yes the pizza went very well with a home brew. All I had was a Dry Irish Stout, but it was great.
__________________
mr_tripp is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-09-2010, 08:17 PM   #8
kracken41
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 21
Default

Great article on pizza dough, with some interesting parallels to brewing:

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/19/dining/19pizza.html

Let the dough rise overnight (or longer).

__________________
kracken41 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-09-2010, 08:23 PM   #9
jjones17
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Nanaimo, BC, Canada
Posts: 617
Liked 7 Times on 7 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nilo View Post
What about the husks on the spent grains?
If you had an efficient mash - pretty much the only thing left is husk. Most of the actual 'grain' has converted to a syrup.

I made bread with this a few times. Less is more. I added way to much to my first batch, and it had the texture of eating bread with crushed plastic inside. Not good.
__________________
jjones17 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-09-2010, 08:24 PM   #10
BendBrewer
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Bend, Oregon
Posts: 3,169
Liked 67 Times on 54 Posts
Likes Given: 23

Default

When I worked at the Brewery, I did a lot of experimenting with spent grains in the kitchen. Tried a pizza dough, bread and even a beer batter for fish and chips using the spent grains.

I wasn't happy with anything except a batch of dog biscuits and that's only because I didn't have to eat them.

Never did try to grind or mill them into a powder though. Since there isn't much flavor in them I was going for the 'LOOK' of the grain and it just didn't work out very well.

So I stuck with using beer or wort in recipes in things from Mustard to BBQ sauce to cakes and ice cream. I left the spent grains for the pig farmer.

__________________
CarPort Brewery
JCMAC Farms Garden
BendBrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
What do you do with the spent grain? jim4065 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 55 12-02-2010 01:08 AM
Spent grain preservation and grain drying stephelton General Beer Discussion 9 12-30-2009 01:46 PM
Spent grain pizza MikeRLynch Cooking & Pairing 12 10-24-2009 03:09 PM
Spent Grain?? Kplum Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 13 03-23-2009 02:10 PM
Spent Grain Uncle Fat General Techniques 15 03-04-2005 07:48 PM