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Old 04-24-2007, 05:17 PM   #1
fretman124
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Default Lovibond =SRM?

Is there a formula or some sort of way to convert Lovibond to SRM? I'm looking at beer styles and the color of the beer is given in lovibond. I use beertools to work with recipes and they give color in SRM. How can I tell what 78 degrees L is in SRM?

Thanks

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Old 04-24-2007, 06:34 PM   #2
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My understanding is that Lovibond and SRM are almost exactly the same. The differences in value are fractions of a point, and not really something to worry about. People still use ºL to describe how dark a grain is, but use SRM to describe the color of the beer. They are pretty much interchangeable.

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Old 04-24-2007, 06:47 PM   #3
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here you go. . .

°L = (SRM + 0.6) / 1.35


Just do a little algebra to rearrange it, and you'll get SRM.

Cheers

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Old 04-24-2007, 06:49 PM   #4
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Oh, and keep in mind that Lovibond is an old way of comparing the color of the extract from a particular grain to that of colored glass, using some sort of colorimeter, which, in and of itself is not greatly accurate. Its mostly an estimation.

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Old 04-25-2007, 01:57 AM   #5
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John Palmer devotes a bit of discussion in his book "How to Brew" about the relationship between Lovibond and SRM.

If I remember correctly, at one end of the scale they're identical, but as colors get darker (or is it lighter?) the match goes away.

Check out his book...................

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Old 04-25-2007, 04:43 PM   #6
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If you use the formula given in this thread, the 78 L calculates to a 104 SRM. Unless you have a spectrophotometer, you are not going to tell any difference once the beer appears dark to the human eye.. It will just be dark. Beers generally are "dark" at a L or SRM of about 17 -20. After that, it is difficult to assess color with the eye. For colors of beer where a difference can be observed, generally L = SRM.

I hope this helps.

Dr Malt

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Old 04-25-2007, 07:45 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Malt
If you use the formula given in this thread, the 78 L calculates to a 104 SRM. Unless you have a spectrophotometer, you are not going to tell any difference once the beer appears dark to the human eye.. It will just be dark. Beers generally are "dark" at a L or SRM of about 17 -20. After that, it is difficult to assess color with the eye. For colors of beer where a difference can be observed, generally L = SRM.

I hope this helps.

Dr Malt
Thanks Dr. Malt! that the makes the most sense, to my simple beer soaked mind, anyway
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Old 10-14-2012, 08:51 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Biermann View Post
here you go. . .

°L = (SRM + 0.6) / 1.35


Just do a little algebra to rearrange it, and you'll get SRM.

Cheers
So.. carry the one and... awww sh*t. Basically it's the same....
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Old 01-09-2013, 01:02 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by petree3 View Post
So.. carry the one and... awww sh*t. Basically it's the same....
Not quite. Given a Lovibond of 17 would convert to 23 SRM which IS a bit different.
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Old 01-09-2013, 01:09 PM   #10
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In case anyone wanted it,

SRM = (1.35 x °L) - 0.6

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