New Giveaway - Wort Monster Conical Fermenter!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Beer Discussion > Just What's Going on When Bottle Conditioning?




Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-07-2011, 02:08 AM   #1
david58
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Oregon
Posts: 62
Default Just What's Going on When Bottle Conditioning?

Noob, here, with a total of seven or eight batches under my belt (just look, they're all right there...).

I bottle, never have kegged. Right now just bottle the 22oz-ers, as I like a real glass of beer when I sit down to have one - bought some nice big beer glasses just for that purpose.

Now here is my question: Besides just carbonating, what is going on as the beer "conditions"? What mellows the hops "edge"? Just what is going on in there?

I enjoy tasting the beers as they age - some, like my stout are wonderful from day one, and some others like a recent IPA took two months to really mellow out.

So, we ain't just carbonating, but what the heck else is going on in that bottle? And do I lose something by going to kegging with forced CO2?

Just trying to understand what this part of the process is, and maybe how to predict where its going.



__________________
david58 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-07-2011, 03:57 AM   #2
Suthrncomfrt1884
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Rockford, Illinois
Posts: 4,079
Liked 23 Times on 22 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

I find it odd that your stouts taste fine from day one but not your IPA. It should be exactly the opposite. My stouts take 3-4 months to get good. My IPAs I drink as fresh as possible.

Either way.... when you bottle condition, it's basically like an extended secondary fermentation. It gives the yeast a little extra time to clean up off flavors and help the flavors meld.



__________________
He who drinks beer sleeps well. He who sleeps well cannot sin. He who does not sin goes to heaven.

Another HERMS rig...
Suthrncomfrt1884 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-07-2011, 05:15 AM   #3
ReverseApacheMaster
Registered User
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Keller, Texas
Posts: 4,887
Liked 227 Times on 191 Posts

Default

The people over in the brew science forum would be able to give you all the gory details but there are actually a lot of processes going on at once. As Suthrncomfrt said it is like an extended secondary fermentation, so if you are force carbing but you have given your beer several weeks/months then it matters a lot less how long you let the beer carbonate.

Any diacetyl in the beer is absorbed back into the yeasts which removes any buttery taste from the beer. Similarly, during fermentation yeasts dump out various enzymes and other byproducts which will break down or be reabsorbed by the yeasts after fermentation completes. That all helps to eliminate off flavors.

Some of the byproducts are fatty acids that combine with ethanol to form esters. The fatty acids generally have undesirable flavors while ester flavors are generally desired in several beers styles (e.g. Belgian, some English).

I believe the carbonic acid (carbonation) also affects some of those byproducts and helps change their flavor components and breakdown/conversion into other chemicals.

I speculate that some of those processes are slowed down or possibly stopped by the cold temperatures force carbed kegs are kept in while serving. Anything you are losing by force kegging is more likely from quickly bringing the beer into a cold environment as opposed to letting the carbonation set in slowly.

__________________
ReverseApacheMaster is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-07-2011, 09:51 AM   #4
mikeysab
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 22 reviews
 
mikeysab's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: staten island
Posts: 3,985
Liked 350 Times on 291 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

y

Quote:
Originally Posted by Suthrncomfrt1884 View Post
I find it odd that your stouts taste fine from day one but not your IPA. It should be exactly the opposite.
I thought the same exact thing when I read that. I've brewed an oatmeal stout and a chocolate cherry stout that were not good beers before at least 2 months in the bottle.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper
We be in a big hurry for dope beer with much alcamahol and flavor, quality, balance, and aroma don't matter.
Mikeysab on untappd.
mikeysab is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-07-2011, 01:02 PM   #5
RM-MN
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Solway, MN
Posts: 6,130
Liked 640 Times on 536 Posts
Likes Given: 187

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeysab View Post
y

I thought the same exact thing when I read that. I've brewed an oatmeal stout and a chocolate cherry stout that were not good beers before at least 2 months in the bottle.
Maybe you have different taste expectations for you stouts. Not everyone's tastes run the same. Why, I've heard some people love Bud Lite, the only beer I've ever dumped down the drain.
__________________
RM-MN is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-07-2011, 01:40 PM   #6
david58
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Oregon
Posts: 62
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RM-MN View Post
Maybe you have different taste expectations for you stouts. Not everyone's tastes run the same. Why, I've heard some people love Bud Lite, the only beer I've ever dumped down the drain.
I actually have a taster for stouts. By that I mean I have been drinking them, a wide variety, for way longer than I have been brewing. But this one spent about two weeks in primary, and 6 in secondary. Maybe that helps?

My IPA's tend to taste like I am eating raw hops till they've been in the bottle a while.

I have an amber that I bottled at the same time as the stout, which I hopped like an IPA, and it tastes wonderful, but just hasn't carbed.

I guess I'll look over at the other site and see what the science nerds (I are one) are saying. It did seem strange that the stout was good so fast, so maybe it'll be really good in a couple of months if it lasts that long.


__________________
david58 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bottle conditioning bmbox12 General Beer Discussion 20 04-29-2010 05:59 PM
could my bottle conditioning be done in 6 days? bguzz General Beer Discussion 2 02-15-2010 07:11 AM
Bottle Conditioning ? bmbox12 General Beer Discussion 12 09-18-2009 03:10 PM
You all were right (bottle conditioning) JnJ General Beer Discussion 3 01-15-2007 03:20 PM
Bottle conditioning for real? fsinger General Beer Discussion 13 07-08-2005 10:49 AM