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Old 04-25-2008, 01:09 PM   #21
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Alright, I'm in.

Let's start thinking about how to approach this. Basic first question; American-style barleywine or English as the base?



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Old 04-25-2008, 01:12 PM   #22
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I think I am in, but what happened to the 9-9-9 dopplebock idea? just curious, I kinda stoped keeping up with that thread thinking it was a done deal.



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Old 04-25-2008, 01:17 PM   #23
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Anyone up for a Weizenbock?

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Old 04-25-2008, 01:21 PM   #24
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For 9/9/9? Probably not. I like the idea of a barleywine that's jacked up somehow; Americanize it, be a little flexible with it. I love the idea of the smoked barleywine that David_42 made (although I wouldn't use peat malt). I like the idea of different base malts melding together.

Weizenbock's just not a favorite style for me, and dopplebocks I almost think of wanting to be brewed in a more-traditional manner. An American barleywine, though - much more flexible.

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Old 04-25-2008, 01:22 PM   #25
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I figured it might be nice to post the BJCP style guidelines so people can review them. My personal vote is for American Style.

English Barleywine

Code:
19B. English Barleywine
Aroma: Very rich and strongly malty, often with a caramel-like
aroma. May have moderate to strong fruitiness, often with a
dried-fruit character. English hop aroma may range from mild
to assertive. Alcohol aromatics may be low to moderate, but
never harsh, hot or solventy. The intensity of these aromatics
often subsides with age. The aroma may have a rich character
including bready, toasty, toffee, molasses, and/or treacle notes.
Aged versions may have a sherry-like quality, possibly vinous
or port-like aromatics, and generally more muted malt aromas.
Low to no diacetyl.
Appearance: Color may range from rich gold to very dark
amber or even dark brown. Often has ruby highlights, but
should not be opaque. Low to moderate off-white head; may
have low head retention. May be cloudy with chill haze at
cooler temperatures, but generally clears to good to brilliant
clarity as it warms. The color may appear to have great depth,
as if viewed through a thick glass lens. High alcohol and viscosity
may be visible in “legs” when beer is swirled in a glass.
Flavor: Strong, intense, complex, multi-layered malt flavors
ranging from bready and biscuity through nutty, deep toast,
dark caramel, toffee, and/or molasses. Moderate to high malty
sweetness on the palate, although the finish may be moderately
sweet to moderately dry (depending on aging). Some
oxidative or vinous flavors may be present, and often complex
alcohol flavors should be evident. Alcohol flavors shouldn’t be
harsh, hot or solventy. Moderate to fairly high fruitiness, often
with a dried-fruit character. Hop bitterness may range from
just enough for balance to a firm presence; balance therefore
ranges from malty to somewhat bitter. Low to moderately
high hop flavor (usually UK varieties). Low to no diacetyl.
Mouthfeel: Full-bodied and chewy, with a velvety, luscious
texture (although the body may decline with long conditioning).
A smooth warmth from aged alcohol should be present,
and should not be hot or harsh. Carbonation may be low to
moderate, depending on age and conditioning.
Overall Impression: The richest and strongest of the English
Ales. A showcase of malty richness and complex, intense flavors.
The character of these ales can change significantly over
time; both young and old versions should be appreciated for
what they are. The malt profile can vary widely; not all examples
will have all possible flavors or aromas.
History: Usually the strongest ale offered by a brewery, and in
recent years many commercial examples are now vintagedated.
Normally aged significantly prior to release. Often associated
with the winter or holiday season.
Comments: Although often a hoppy beer, the English Barleywine
places less emphasis on hop character than the American
Barleywine and features English hops. English versions can be
darker, maltier, fruitier, and feature richer specialty malt flavors
than American Barleywines.
Ingredients: Well-modified pale malt should form the backbone
of the grist, with judicious amounts of caramel malts.
Dark malts should be used with great restraint, if at all, as
most of the color arises from a lengthy boil. English hops such
as Northdown, Target, East Kent Goldings and Fuggles. Characterful
English yeast.
Vital Statistics:
OG: 1.080 – 1.120
IBUs: 35 – 70
FG: 1.018 – 1.030
SRM: 8 – 22
ABV: 8 – 12%
Commercial Examples: Thomas Hardy’s Ale, Burton Bridge
Thomas Sykes Old Ale, J.W. Lee’s Vintage Harvest Ale, Robinson’s
Old Tom, Fuller’s Golden Pride, AleSmith Old Numbskull,
Young’s Old Nick (unusual in its 7.2% ABV), Whitbread
Gold Label, Old Dominion Millenium, North Coast Old Stock
Ale (when aged), Weyerbacher Blithering Idiot
American Barleywine
Code:
19C. American Barleywine
Aroma: Very rich and intense maltiness. Hop character moderate
to assertive and often showcases citrusy or resiny American
varieties (although other varieties, such as floral, earthy or
spicy English varieties or a blend of varieties, may be used).
Low to moderately strong fruity esters and alcohol aromatics.
Malt character may be sweet, caramelly, bready, or fairly neutral.
However, the intensity of aromatics often subsides with
age. No diacetyl.
Appearance: Color may range from light amber to medium
copper; may rarely be as dark as light brown. Often has ruby
highlights. Moderately-low to large off-white to light tan head;
may have low head retention. May be cloudy with chill haze
at cooler temperatures, but generally clears to good to brilliant
clarity as it warms. The color may appear to have great depth,
as if viewed through a thick glass lens. High alcohol and viscosity
may be visible in “legs” when beer is swirled in a glass.
Flavor: Strong, intense malt flavor with noticeable bitterness.
Moderately low to moderately high malty sweetness on the
palate, although the finish may be somewhat sweet to quite
dry (depending on aging). Hop bitterness may range from
moderately strong to aggressive. While strongly malty, the
balance should always seem bitter. Moderate to high hop flavor
(any variety). Low to moderate fruity esters. Noticeable
alcohol presence, but sharp or solventy alcohol flavors are
undesirable. Flavors will smooth out and decline over time,
but any oxidized character should be muted (and generally be
masked by the hop character). May have some bready or
caramelly malt flavors, but these should not be high. Roasted
or burnt malt flavors are inappropriate. No diacetyl.
Mouthfeel: Full-bodied and chewy, with a velvety, luscious
texture (although the body may decline with long conditioning).
Alcohol warmth should be present, but not be excessively
hot. Should not be syrupy and under-attenuated. Carbonation
may be low to moderate, depending on age and conditioning.
Overall Impression: A well-hopped American interpretation
of the richest and strongest of the English ales. The hop character
should be evident throughout, but does not have to be
unbalanced. The alcohol strength and hop bitterness often
combine to leave a very long finish.
History: Usually the strongest ale offered by a brewery, and in
recent years many commercial examples are now vintagedated.
Normally aged significantly prior to release. Often associated
with the winter or holiday season.
Comments: The American version of the Barleywine tends to
have a greater emphasis on hop bitterness, flavor and aroma
than the English Barleywine, and often features American hop
varieties. Differs from an Imperial IPA in that the hops are not
extreme, the malt is more forward, and the body is richer and
more characterful.
Ingredients: Well-modified pale malt should form the backbone
of the grist. Some specialty or character malts may be
used. Dark malts should be used with great restraint, if at all,
as most of the color arises from a lengthy boil. Citrusy American
hops are common, although any varieties can be used in
quantity. Generally uses an attenuative American yeast.
Vital Statistics:
OG: 1.080 – 1.120
IBUs: 50 – 120
FG: 1.016 – 1.030
SRM: 10 – 19
ABV: 8 – 12%
Commercial Examples: Sierra Nevada Bigfoot, Great Divide
Old Ruffian, Victory Old Horizontal, Rogue Old Crustacean,
Avery Hog Heaven Barleywine, Bell’s Third Coast Old Ale,
Anchor Old Foghorn, Three Floyds Behemoth, Stone Old
Guardian, Bridgeport Old Knucklehead, Hair of the Dog Doggie
Claws, Lagunitas Olde GnarleyWine, Smuttynose Barleywine,
Flying Dog Horn Dog
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Old 04-25-2008, 01:26 PM   #26
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American BW.

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Old 04-25-2008, 01:30 PM   #27
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I might be partial to an english myself...

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Old 04-25-2008, 03:17 PM   #28
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It would be kind of interesting to do 2 swaps and make a small beer off the second runnings and swap it. Im in for the Barley wine This will be a nice challenge.

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Old 04-25-2008, 03:20 PM   #29
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Damn you, hop shortage!

But yeah, American BW hands down.

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Old 04-25-2008, 03:22 PM   #30
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The American version looks better to me - my .02.

The bird's smoked variant sounds interesting, too.



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