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Old 10-22-2014, 12:39 PM   #1
jlangfo5
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Default I want to learn more about the mash

Hey guys,

I have been trying to learn more about how the mash works, so I read palmers website about the mash, but I am still left wanting to learn more.

I want to know why is that long mashes tend to create more fermentable worts, why does mash thickness really matter for fermentability. Why is that decorating a portion of the wort doesn't kill all the enzyme activity for that portion of the wort even after being boiled for a long time?

The thing that has been getting at me is that starch to sugar conversions are often described as if they are discrete processes, like "Oh Alpha ammalyse happens between this range, and Beta ammalyse happens between this range", when in reality I feel both of the processes are both active at least to some extent outside of those ranges if for no other reason the fact that mash tuns do not hold exactly even temperatures.

Does anyone have any recommended reading?

Thanks

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Old 10-22-2014, 12:42 PM   #2
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idk if you've checked out the wiki here or not but there's a load of info on there.
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/wiki/index.php/Mash

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Old 10-22-2014, 12:47 PM   #3
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I haven't read it, but I would check out "Malt." I bet that has some good detail on mash chemistry.

http://www.amazon.com/Malt-Practical...&keywords=malt

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Old 10-22-2014, 01:07 PM   #4
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http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php...ort_Production

This is a very good go to site for the science behind all things brewing
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Old 10-22-2014, 10:00 PM   #5
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"Why is that decorating a portion of the wort doesn't kill all the enzyme activity for that portion of the wort even after being boiled for a long time?"

I haven't decorated any wort, yet. But, I am willing to learn.

Yes, enzymes become thermally denatured. But, who cares? The majority of enzymes are in the mash tun, not in the decoction kettle. Besides, when decoctions are correctly performed, the decoctions are converted before being brought to boiling. It has to do with the "Oh Alpha ammalyse happens between this range, and Beta ammalyse happens between this range", thing. Controlling enzymatic action, determines what the final product becomes.
The purpose of boiling mash liquid is to stop enzymatic activity. The boiling liquid is used as the final decoction.

"I feel both of the processes are both active at least to some extent outside of those ranges if for no other reason the fact that mash tuns do not hold exactly even temperatures."

That's why the English method works. Dump hot water at a certain temperature on malt and wait for something majical to happen. The mash tun thing isn't always true. Mash tuns are well insulated, some are direct fired. Mine is direct fired and holds temperature without a problem.

Noonan wrote a good book on brewing. He covers all of your questions.

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Old Yesterday, 01:14 AM   #6
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Thanks for the responses guys! I will post back if I have more questions

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