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Old 02-09-2013, 03:30 AM   #1
dpaulbarrett
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Default How to regulate maltiness of a beer

This may sound like (and may be) a stupid question, but what actually makes a beer more or less malty, when malted grain makes up the vast majority of beer? If I wanted to brew a beer that was "less malty," how would I do so? "Adding hops" doesn't really answer it, because you're not decreasing the maltiness, just masking it. Would adding sugar do it, in that this would ferment down and dry the beer out? Again, maybe a dumb question, but I thought I'd ask anyway.

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Old 02-09-2013, 03:34 AM   #2
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Are you brewing grain or extract? If you're brewing grain, Mashing at lower temps creates a light body beer which makes for more fermentable sugars and a "dryer" beer.

If you're doing extract I'm not 100% sure. You could try adding corn sugar or table sugar. They're almost 100% fermentable so they create a dryer tasting beer.

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Old 02-09-2013, 03:48 AM   #3
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there are a lot of variables you could change depending on the way you brew (AG or extract) and the recipes themselves. Lower mash temps or even grain bills for AG. Extract would be just like hoppyhoppyhippo said. Adding corn or cane sugar would create a higher abv and dryer beer.

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Old 02-09-2013, 06:39 AM   #4
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Mash at a lower temperature.

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Old 02-09-2013, 10:48 AM   #5
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On the other side, to increase maltiness mouth feel I usually add some carapils/dextrine to my mash.

I've often found my lighter beers to be thin tasting, added a bit of carapils to the next batch and they are better.

What are you trying to brew?

MT

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Old 02-09-2013, 10:55 AM   #6
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Maltiness is created by using more malt, and using malts that add unfermentable sugars. Crystal or caramel malts, Munich, Vienna, Biscuit all add varying degrees of maltiness.

Adding more hops does not mask the maltiness, it merely offsets, or balances it. If you wish to enhance the malt profile, you want to brew a style that features fewer hops.

Adding sugar will not enhance this quality, as they serve only to boost alcohol.

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Last edited by hercher; 02-24-2013 at 02:24 AM. Reason: typo: adding more hops, not malts....
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Old 02-09-2013, 11:05 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dpaulbarrett View Post
This may sound like (and may be) a stupid question, but what actually makes a beer more or less malty, when malted grain makes up the vast majority of beer?
Maltiness is mouthfeel derived from a number of compounds in the wort; mostly longer chain polysaccharides like dextrines, but also many other compounds.

Here's a discussion on the topic that is more in depth.


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Old 02-23-2013, 11:20 PM   #8
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Thanks, all. This is mostly just a hypothetical question for all future brewings, tastings, and discussions.

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Old 02-24-2013, 12:38 AM   #9
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Using brewing salts can increase maltiness as well. Sulfate increases hop flavor and chloride increases malt flavor. Having a good ratio can really improve your beer and give you another level of control.
http://www.howtobrew.com/section3/chapter15-1.html

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Old 02-24-2013, 12:46 AM   #10
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You could also use a higher attenuating yeast like Nottingham to reduce the maltiness

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