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Old 07-09-2014, 04:40 PM   #21
J343MY
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Originally Posted by grittanomyces View Post
There are very few people who have a natural taste for really hoppy beer (though surprisingly most of those I've met who claim they did were female). For most its an acquired taste, and over time you even build a tolerance, hence why some want it hoppier and hoppier. I wish I could go back to the days when IPAs didn't taste like crap after a month old when the hops fade.
I really don't think its the hoppiness thats the issue, but the bitterness that often accompanies hoppy beers. Make a juicy, citrusy beer with low bitterness, hardly anybody wouldn't love that.
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Old 07-09-2014, 06:02 PM   #22
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I really don't think its the hoppiness thats the issue, but the bitterness that often accompanies hoppy beers. Make a juicy, citrusy beer with low bitterness, hardly anybody wouldn't love that.
Makes sense. For some it's the bitterness that's off-putting, some don't mind the bitterness but don't really care for the hoppy flavor. Some don't like either, but no doubt it's a taste that can be acquired.

Have you tried many of Lagunitas beers? They still have some IBUs, but tend to finish very smooth comparatively, while still busting with great flavor profiles. To me a good balance of flavoring hops to bittering is as important as good malt balance. Too many brewers just think that if you make it bitter, hopheads will like it, not so...

If that's still too much, there are good pales on the market to work up to them, maybe even some hoppy reds would work too. Unless you're just set on liking them quick, then there's nothing wrong with working up to them and getting your palate acquainted to the bitterness and bite. It doesn't make you any less of a beer geek. Plenty of experienced drinkers don't ever prefer IPAs.
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Old 07-09-2014, 06:35 PM   #23
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My favorite style to brew is essentially a very hoppy pale ale. About 5-6% ABV, only about 50-60 IBUs, but nearly all of them through late additions or hop steeps. Plenty of dry hopping as well. So it's a session beer, not powerfully bitter, but very hops dominated, like an IPA. This might also be called a session IPA. It reminds me very much of a big glass of citrus juice.


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